A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 76: Hungarian Memorandum on the Deputy
Foreign Ministers' Meeting in Moscow, February 3, 1975

This memorandum from Hungarian delegate József Marjai on the meeting of Warsaw Pact deputy foreign ministers in Moscow from January 29 to 30 is of interest mainly because it shows how the split between Romania and its allies had widened. Eventually it reached the point where it was impossible to hold joint celebrations of the twentieth anniversary of the Pact. The Romanians had objected to the event because they opposed virtually all joint activities, favoring national celebrations instead. In this case, they proposed a meeting of parliamentarians to discuss the issues of security and coopera- tion in Europe. The absence of celebrations had no military significance but it showed the extent to which Romania had managed to obstruct political unity within the Pact.

By decision of the Warsaw Pact's Political Consultative Committee (PCC) at the meeting in Warsaw in April 1974, a Joint Secretariat was appointed and made responsible for elaborating suggestions regarding the preparation and organization of celebrations commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Warsaw PCC. The Polish People's Republic was charged with coordinating the work of the Joint Secretariat with the cooperation of the PCC's Secretary.

In mid-January of this year, S"tanisław" Trepczyński, Poland's deputy foreign minister, sent the member-states the summary plan of action prepared on the basis of contributions by the heads of delegations during the PCC countries' last meeting and "on the basis of" supplementary suggestions made later. The summary plan of action also incorporates suggestions for developing mechanisms of cooperation within the Organization.


II.

1. The summary plan of action was discussed on January 29–30 in Moscow under the auspices of the Joint Secretariat established during the April 1974 PCC meeting.

"…"

It became apparent during the discussions and in finalizing the minutes that the member-states, except the Romanian comrades, agreed with the suggestions. Except for holding the Political Consultative Committee meeting on the occasion of the anniversary and setting the date at a later time, the Romanian delegation objected to any suggestions that would have demonstrated the unity of the Warsaw Pact countries and the strengthening of their cooperation; their recommendations were aimed at changing the political content of the actions.

"…"

Since it did not seem possible, even after repeated attempts, to work out a text acceptable to the Romanian comrades, by agreement with them, their objections and

-393-

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