A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 77: Iakubovskii Report on the State
of the Unified Armed Forces, December 31, 1975

In an earlier account of a meeting between Ceaușescu and Brezhnev in 1970 (Doc- ument No. 72), the Romanian leader boasted that he had easily prevailed over the Sov- iet general secretary one-on-one. But in the larger picture Moscow ultimately had the upper hand over Bucharest. In this document, Warsaw Pact Supreme Commander Iakubovskii reports on the state of the Unified Armed Forces. He indicates that opera- tional plans and the coordination of forces are being handled without Romania's par- ticipation, and that while Pact members have signed agreements to develop their forces over the next five years (1976–1980), this plan excludes Romania. By 1975, therefore, Romania for all intents and purposes was no longer a member of the military structures of the alliance. France was in a similar position with respect to NATO except that Pre- sident Charles de Gaulle had taken the initiative in withdrawing from the organization's military structures, whereas Romania found itself isolated by its erstwhile partners.

"…"

During the course of the year, a new operational plan of combat use and plans for joint action by Unified Armed Forces of the Warsaw Treaty were perfected in practice. Troops from the Army of the Socialist Republic of Romania were excluded.

"…"

In most of the Allied armies supplies of material resources, excluding certain types of ammunition and fuel, have reached agreed levels.

At the same time, notwithstanding the generally successful fulfillment of the protocols, a significant quantity of military equipment and armaments remains outdated among the troops and fleets of some of the allied countries, including tactical–operational missiles, tanks, aircraft, and combat ships. There remains a lag in the stockpiling of supplies of material resources. The construction of hangars for aircraft at permanent airfields continues to proceed slowly. There have also been a series of shortfalls in the preparation of communications and contacts. All of this to a definite extent lowers the combat preparedness and fighting capacity of the Unified Armed Forces.

The unified and national commands considered these deficiencies in elaborating the protocols for developing the army and naval forces of the Unified Armed Forces for the new five-year plan.

As of January 1, 1976, the protocols for the years 1976–1980 were signed by all the allied armies except the Army of the Socialist Republic of Romania, and were approved by the appropriate party and state organs of the countries of the Warsaw Pact.

"…"

The mobilization plans are closely tied to the plans for making the troops ready for action and constitutes a common system for transferring the armed forces from a peacetime to a wartime footing. Last year's exercises with practical mobilization

-395-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.