A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 84: Speech by Brezhnev at the Political Consultative
Committee Meeting in Moscow, November 22, 1978

Addressing his fellow Warsaw Pact leaders, Brezhnev reflects an increasingly dour view of the world situation, deploring the deterioration of détente with the United States. He notes that among other things the Western allies are increasing their military spending, which he ascribes to the correlation of forces turning against them. He is troubled by indications that China and NATO may be starting to develop closer economic and mil- itary cooperation, and he invokes the socialist camp's "sacred duty"—not to disturb the equilibrium of military power. As the decade of the 1970s came to a close, Brezhnev was not alone among Soviet and other Warsaw Pact leaders in his concern for the direc- tion of events, particularly the arms race and the hardening of U.S. policy, but he has no clear answer at this point for what to do. The meeting decided to press for a statute for command in war time.

The strengthening of the positions of socialism in the world in recent years is an incontrovertible fact.

Our countries' defenses have become even stronger. Today we are not weaker than the imperialist powers and their main military alliance, which is aimed at the socialist world—neither on land, nor in the air, nor on the high seas.

Others might not, but you and I know well that the countries of the Warsaw Treaty have not done anything and are not doing anything "presently" above what is called for by the requirements of a reliable defense of the borders of socialism. However, even the tentative parity in armaments and armed forces is perceived quite nervously in the ruling imperialist circles. In those circles—especially in the USA and in the ruling leadership of NATO—they obviously do not want to let go of the hope of achieving some kind of breakthrough, of overturning the existing correlation of forces, and of gaining an opportunity to impose their will "and" their ways on the rest of the world.

Washington's defense budget is 130 billion dollars in the current financial year. They are working on new systems of weapons of mass destruction—we know this very well—in closed American engineering and construction offices. I have in mind not only the neutron bomb, but also laser weapons, genetic, infrasound weapons, and so on.

The Americans are pushing their allies toward the path of unrestrained growth of military expenditures. The Washington session of the NATO Council is a clear expression of that. The NATO bloc presented a certain "gift" to their people, who had been following the special U.N. session on disarmament with hope—an additional program to increase armaments over ten years. They earmarked an additional 80 billion dollars over and above the gigantic military outlays that had been planned before.

-418-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.