A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 95: Memorandum of Conversation with Marshals
Ustinov and Kulikov concerning a Soviet War Game, June 14, 1982

This Soviet war game, described to East German Defense Minister Heinz Hoffmann by Soviet marshals Dmitrii Ustinov and Viktor Kulikov, envisioned several air and sea landings—on the Danish islands, in the Lower Saxony area of West Germany, and in France. Interestingly, one of the Soviet assumptions in this exercise, which took place immediately after the Polish crisis, was that Poland and Romania would want to leave the Warsaw Pact. The Russians pointed out that Romania had recently refused per- mission to Warsaw Pact troops to cross its territory in order to take part in an exercise in Bulgaria. Ustinov remarks that Ceaușescu either does not understand the current situation "or he may be out of his mind." Exercise planners also presumed that China had started a war against the Soviet Union.

"…"

On instruction of the general secretary of the Central Committee of the CPSU and chairman of the Defense Council of the USSR, Comrade Leonid Brezhnev, an operational–strategic war game involving the leading organs of the Soviet Army and Navy under direction of Comrade Minister Ustinov is taking place between June 10 and June 20, 1982.

"…"

The operational–strategic war game has been based on a most complex military–political and military–strategic situation.

In detail, there have been the following new aspects:

1. War was initiated in the Far East by China forty days ago, with the active support of Japan and Korea, reunified on a capitalist basis. So far, the U.S. is not yet participating in the war in the Far East.

A total of 290 divisions have been deployed in that area against the Soviet Union. The adversary managed to intrude onto the territory of the Soviet Union and of the People's Republic of Mongolia. Vladivostok has been taken by Chinese troops. Incursions were effected up to a depth of 500 kilometers in the direction of Ulaanbaatar.

On the 40th day of war, the Soviet troops formed for a counteroffensive in the Far East.

By unleashing war in the Far East, U.S. imperialism and NATO pursued the goal of averting the complete deployment of Soviet troops in the Western theater of war, and inducing the USSR to deploy troops in the Far East, so as to initiate a surprise attack in the European war theater as well.

In the Arab region, Saudi Arabia and Iran joined the hostilities on the side of the adversary. Two additional fronts were formed against this grouping.

-462-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.