A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 96: Report on Speech by Marshal
Ogarkov at a Warsaw Pact Chiefs of Staff Meeting
in Minsk, September 8–10, 1982

Speaking to a meeting of Warsaw Pact chiefs of staff in Minsk, Soviet Marshal Nikolai Ogarkov draws an alarming picture of the state of the world, comparing it to the con- ditions that immediately preceded the outbreak of World War II. Referring to the sanc- tions the West imposed against Poland and the USSR, he asserts that the United States has already declared war on the Soviet Union and its allies. The U.S. goal, he says, is to destabilize the Warsaw Pact countries through economic warfare while at the same time planning to wage limited nuclear war. The danger of war, he says, has never been so great, in part because the "leading imperialist circles" are so unpredictable. His remarks are a stark expression of the anxiety provoked by what Moscow regarded as the Reagan administration's twin military and political challenge.

"…"

At the beginning of his remarks, Cde. Marshal of the Soviet Union "Nikolai V." Ogarkov elaborated on the policy of peace "conducted by" the Soviet Union and the countries of the Warsaw Treaty.

"…"

At the present time, the international situation is very serious and extremely complicated. It is only comparable to the situation in the 1930s, on the verge of the outbreak of the Second World War.

The advent of the "Ronald" Reagan presidency is evocative of the Fascist seizure of power. Indeed, the U.S. administration is organizing the struggle against socialism, particularly against the Soviet Union, in a similar fashion.

The Reagan administration has inaugurated open preparations for war. This can be seen every day in the political, economical, diplomatic, and military fields.

In saying so, it has to be considered that Reagan is only a puppet of the most aggressive circles of imperialism.

All instruments available to imperialism are being deployed against the Soviet Union and against the socialist camp.

The United States has in effect already declared war on us, the Soviet Union and some other states of the Warsaw Treaty. In several fields, the battle is already going on.

The goal of imperialism has always been the destruction of socialism.

Since the beginning of Soviet power, imperialism has always tried to liquidate the achievements of socialism with military power.

A pattern can be detected similar to the events in Hungary in 1956, to the events in the ČSSR in 1968, and to the present events in the People's Republic of Poland. We have to regard all these intrigues of imperialism as a single consistent policy.

-466-

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