A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 102: Statement by Marshal Ustinov
at the Committee of Ministers of Defense Meeting
in Sofia, December 5–7, 1983

This meeting provided a forum for Soviet Defense Minister Marshal Dmitrii Ustinov to speak to his Warsaw Pact colleagues about the dangers posed by the West's decision to deploy Euromissiles.34He declares that the move calls for measures to preserve "equi- librium"—which ironically was the West's rationale for deploying them in the first place. This view was the Warsaw Pact's public position but was apparently genuinely believed by its leaders because Ustinov's remarks were made during a closed meeting. Commenting that the West is undertaking unprecedented preparations for war, he wonders aloud how the alliance should respond. He cites Soviet party General Secretary Iurii Andropov's instructions not to copy the enemy's armament program but to "go one's own way," and force the adversary to adjust accordingly.

In response to the aggressive actions of the Reagan administration and the governments of several other NATO countries, the Soviet Union has declared that it is lifting its voluntary moratorium on the deployment of intermediate-range Soviet nuclear weapons in the European part of the country. These weapons will now also be deployed at locations from which they could reach the territories of the relevant West European countries.

In coordination with the GDR and the ČSSR, preparations for stationing longerrange tactical missiles on the territories of these countries will be accelerated.

As regards U.S. territory, the necessary retaliatory measures will be taken. The Americans will not fail to notice the change in their situation after the stationing of their missiles in Western Europe. "…"

The above-mentioned measures are necessary for our security. American Imperialism has announced a "crusade" against Socialism. It is attempting to destroy Socialism as a social system and to establish itself as the dominant world power. Never before has the aggressiveness of American imperialism been so apparent. The American invasion of the small and essentially defenseless state of Grenada,35 which constituted a breach of faith and was totally unprovoked, has demonstrated that the Washington administration brutally disrespects the norms of international law and is capable of the most irresponsible war adventures and crimes.

"President Ronald" Reagan's intention is to demonstrate to the Soviet Union, the

34 The Pershing-2 intermediate-range missiles and cruise missiles to be installed in Western Europe to counter the already deployed Soviet SS-20 missiles targeted at the area.

35 U.S. forces invaded Grenada on October 25, 1983, after former Deputy Prime Minister Bernard Coard, a hard-line Marxist, had seized power on the island in a coup. The move was part of the Reagan administration's campaign to contest perceived communist gains, particularly in Central America and the Caribbean.

-490-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.