A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 105: Report by the Head of Soviet
Military Intelligence to the Committee of Ministers
of Defense, December 3–5, 1984

As the political leadership in Moscow was on the verge of adopting "new thinking" under Mikhail Gorbachev, the Soviet military remained vested in presenting an alarmist view of the international scene. Here, Gen. Petr I. Ivashutin, head of Soviet military intelligence, gives his perspective on NATO's long-term armament program. The West- ern alliance by this time had successfully implemented the program adopted in 1979, which included the introduction of "smart" (high-precision) conventional weapons and the AirLand strategy of deep thrusts behind the lines of advancing enemy forces, along with its attendant build-up of military capabilities. Ivashutin argues that these developments show the enemy's determination to win. He implicitly holds up this threat as a warning against taking a softer line—a warning the Soviet leadership under Gorbachev would not heed.

"…"

In the past years, a new, even more dangerous phase of the North Atlantic Pact's militarization has begun, despite the fact that its military potential has for a long time exceeded reasonable defense requirements. The stationing of new American intermediate-range missiles in Western Europe continues, which is creating an additional strategic nuclear threat to the Warsaw Pact states. The "Western" alliance's longterm armaments program (through 1993) will be carried out at an accelerated pace in the hopes of gaining military superiority.

NATO's military spending in the period 1978–1984 is over 1.7 billion dollars.

The contribution by NATO's European member-states towards financing war preparations has increased significantly and represents over half of U.S. military spending. The contribution from countries such as Great Britain and France has increased by 80 percent and the FRG by 40 percent. Italy and Greece's contribution is 2.5 times higher and Turkey's is 9 times higher.

In this period, NATO's nuclear weapons potential in Europe has further developed. Troop placements in the theater have been strengthened; soldiers have been reequipped with new, modernized weapons systems and military tactics; the organizational structure as well as the leadership system and the military–technical support system are being improved; the mobilization base is being expanded and intensive operational training of the staff and troops is being carried out. "…"

1. With respect to NATO member-states' nuclear weapons in the theater, the number of nuclear-capable delivery vehicles has risen 25 percent and at present amounts to over 3,600. These could be used to launch over 4,200 nuclear warheads.

2. The formation of land forces has been strengthened with 6 newly deployed divisions (France 3, Great Britain, the Netherlands and Denmark 1 division each) and with 5 Spanish divisions.

-500-

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