A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 109: East German Intelligence Assessment of
NATO's Intelligence on the Warsaw Pact, December 16, 1985

This Stasi document shows that the East had an accurate indication of how NATO eva- luated the Warsaw Pact. The authors judge that NATO's knowledge is "mostly accu- rate and reliable," and that the west has concluded that Warsaw Pact military strength and war preparations are constantly on the rise. Intelligence information, such as that compiled in this kind of document, usually came from various sources, mainly West German, thus showing that East German spies and their informants had an extensive run of the FRG Defense Ministry as well as of NATO headquarters.


Assessment of Adversary's Intelligence
on Development of Warsaw Treaty Forces,
1983–1985

PREFACE

The Intelligence services and military intelligence of the NATO countries relentlessly pursue their activities aimed at a comprehensive exploration and assessment of the Warsaw Treaty's military policy and doctrine, armed forces and armaments Treaty.

"…"

For these purposes, they continuously use all sources of information (human intelligence, technical intelligence, official channels). Intelligence collection is realized through a comprehensive and intensive evaluation increasingly based on the use of electronic data. NATO countries conduct this business on a national level and synchronize the results through an intensive informational exchange within NATO structures. These data are constantly being updated at NATO's operational headquarters. "…" These assessments also serve as justification for NATO force requirements and as guidelines for developing weapons technology.

The main actors in intelligence activities, in qualitative as well as quantitative terms, are always the United States, Great Britain and the FRG. France is also very active in this respect and integrated into joint NATO actions through informational exchanges.

Other NATO countries make their contributions according to an agreed division of labor (e.g. the Netherlands against Poland) and their specific potential. Intelligence information also comes from other capitalist countries. Cooperation between the U.S. and the FRG concerning intelligence services and military intelligence has been increased. Besides "providing" mutual support to complete the actual state of knowledge on a worldwide scale, they "NATO" primarily undertake efforts to clarify unresolved questions. "…" It is evident that not all the intelligence obtained flows into NATO channels.

-514-

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