A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 113: Bulgarian Memorandum on the
Bulgarian–Romanian Proposal for a Chemical Weapons-
Free Zone in the Balkans, March 21, 1986

This Bulgarian document refers to a proposal by Bulgaria and Romania to create a nuclear-free zone in the Balkans. It shows that by this time the Soviets came to regard such initiatives by their allies not only as acceptable but consistent with their own goals. This particular proposal met with a reserved response from Turkey and, not surpris- ingly, Albania. Greece, and especially Yugoslavia, were more positive in their reactions.


MEMORANDUM

At the initiative of the Bulgarian side, talks between the foreign ministers of the People's Republic of Bulgaria, Petar Mladenov, and of the Socialist Republic of Romania, Ilie Vaduva, were held on March 19, 1986, in Warsaw, where views were exchanged regarding the work accomplished on the Bulgarian–Romanian initiative to turn the Balkans into a chemical weapons-free zone.

The Romanian minister informed that, in compliance with the agreements between Comrade Todor Zhivkov and Comrade Nicolae Ceaușescu, the Romanian side has submitted a Declaration-Appeal to all Balkan states. The governments of Turkey, Yugoslavia and Albania have sent a written response. Greece has replied verbally on behalf of "Prime Minister Andreas" Papandreou to the Romanian ambassador in Athens. Vaduva expressed his personal opinion that the Greek side had intended to submit a written reply during Papandreou's delayed visit to Bucharest.

The replies received differ substantially. Turkey has some reservations about the proposal. So does Albania. However, Yugoslavia and Greece appreciate the initiative and would readily participate in taking the next steps. Turkey's reservations center on the point that problems like this can be resolved only on a global scale. Albania has declared that the country possesses no chemical weapons and has no intentions to produce or store any on its territory. Moreover, problems of this kind can be solved only within the framework of Europe. Yugoslavia has a similar position, connecting this idea with the progress of the Geneva talks.

Vaduva stated that the document has been submitted to Geneva, Stockholm and about 35 other states. Most of the countries have assessed the proposal in a positive way. They regard it as a contribution to the abolition of chemical weapons. Vaduva informed that Comrade Ceaușescu pays special attention to the responses coming from these countries. There is a common feature in that no Balkan country has in its possession, or would like to be the recipient of, chemical weapons. Upon receiving a written response from Greece, we could come to an agreement on the next steps.

After expressing thanks for the information, Cde. Petar Mladenov qualified the replies of the different states as an expression of their positive attitude towards this

-526-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.