A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 117: Czechoslovak Summary of the
Committee of Ministers of Foreign Affairs Meeting
in Bucharest, October 18, 1986

Following shortly after the Reykjavik summit between Mikhail Gorbachev and Ro- nald Reagan, this Warsaw Pact foreign ministers' meeting provided a forum for the Soviets to explain the content of the summit to the allies and to solicit their coopera- tion in taking follow-up action. In answer to the Soviet call to retain the initiative in international affairs, the ministers agree to wage a "broad offensive" not only in the ongoing Geneva talks but also at the CSCE. Each Warsaw Pact representative pro- ceeds to advance proposals for how to accomplish this task.

A regular session of the Warsaw Pact Committee of Foreign Ministers took place in Bucharest on October 14–15, 1986, in accordance with the timetable of meetings of the Warsaw Pact's highest political institutions. This had been approved at the 1986 Budapest session of the Warsaw Pact Political Consultative Committee within the framework of strengthening the Warsaw Pact mechanism. Originally, the session had been planned for October 16–17, 1986; the change occurred because of the USSR leadership's initiative to inform the foreign ministers about the proceedings and results of the Gorbachev–Reagan Reykjavik meeting immediately after its conclusion. "…"

Before the session of the Committee of Foreign Ministers, an informal private meeting of the ministers took place "…", in which "Foreign Minister" Shevardnadze gave detailed information on the preparation, course and conclusions of the meeting between Gorbachev and Reagan in Reykjavik on October 11–12, 1986. "…"

The decision to meet at Reykjavik amounted to a psychological turning point for Reagan. "Secretary of State" G. Shultz played a constructive role in that. At the same time, influential forces had been opposing the meeting. The meeting has been a tactical success for the Soviet leadership. "…"

Reagan saw the aim of the meeting as probing the possibility of Gorbachev's visit to the United States. The USSR replied that the visit would take place when possibilities for reaching particular agreements were visible. A summit without any results would be a political scandal.

Seeing that he could not expect any initiative by Reagan, Gorbachev suggested opening specific negotiations on nuclear and space disarmament at the ministerial level.

In strategic affairs, the USSR introduced a new variant of the 50 percent reduction without including missiles in forward areas. The United States had not expected this approach. The USSR further declared that it would consider the United States' interest in a reduction of heavy inter-continental ballistic missiles, and proclaimed its expectation that the United States would understand the USSR's interest in a reduction of U.S. submarine-launched ballistic missiles.

-541-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.