A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 118: Summary of Statements at the Military
Council Meeting in Bucharest, November 10–11, 1986

At this gathering of the Military Council, Marshal Kulikov continues his refrain of warning about the relentless growth of NATO's military potential. A large part of Kulikov's concern is over the prospective "perfection of strategic nuclear forces" although, in his view, Euromissiles also represent an increased danger of war. Even if an arms control agreement is eventually reached, he says, the imperialists will contin- ue to pose the threat of war. While this is not a new position for Kulikov, it was in line with Gorbachev's own pessimistic attitude towards the prospects for arms control fol- lowing the recent Reykjavik summit, where he had failed to convince Reagan to give up SDI. Not suprisingly, though, is the fact that Ceaușescu holds an entirely contra- dictory view. The Romanian leader declares emphatically that there is currently no danger of war, and urges further steps towards disarmament.

a) Statement by Marshal Viktor Kulikov

Following are remarks by the supreme commander of the unified armed forces on questions concerning the increase of fighting strength and combat readiness of the unified armed forces.

The United States and the other NATO countries continue to stir up the danger of war. The material foundation for all kinds of war have been expanded. A special danger lies in the perfection of strategic nuclear forces.

"…"

Considerable efforts have been undertaken to increase the fighting options of the general purpose forces concentrated in the European theater of war and the Atlantic. In Europe we face a group of NATO troops ready for battle, fully equipped and well trained.

"…"

The intensity and scope of the operational preparation of the NATO forces have assumed a dangerous character. The increased danger of war that all this implies requires us to take measures for further increasing the security of our countries and people and to increase the combat readiness of the forces of Warsaw Treaty member-states, beyond the continued struggle for peace.

Based on the conclusions from the meeting in Reykjavik, we have to consider the qualitatively new situation, which could be the result of a new policy orientation by the United States and the NATO bloc.

Two possible directions for the development of the military–political situation became apparent.

The first and most dangerous would be the refusal by the United States to sign any agreements on the reduction of nuclear armaments and their elimination. In this case,

-546-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.