A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 119: Summary of Soviet Statement
at the Committee of Ministers of Defense Meeting in
Warsaw, December 1–3, 1986

In these remarks, Soviet Deputy Defense Minister Gen. J.F. Ivanovskii reveals some of the improvements the Warsaw Pact plans to make in its conventional forces in order to counter advancements on the NATO side. Not a political speech, the statement is a straight description of how the alliance plans to upgrade its forces. One innovation would be the addition of new airborne assault troops, which he says would "make offensive operations more dynamic." Another would be the introduction of marine amphibious units. There is little sense here that the Warsaw Pact is falling significant- ly behind NATO, which is a more typical theme in many official statements.

"…"

The ground forces of the allied armies are currently equipped with modern arms and combat technology which allow for striking in considerable depth behind the enemy lines. In order to take more advantage of these strikes it is currently expedient to increase the mobility of the army by creating air assault unit detachments within the fronts and armies.

The large-scale deployment of air assault troops will make offensive operations more dynamic. It will enable us to extend the effect on the enemy from the frontline deep into the hinterland, and will increase the speed of attack by our troops.

The kind of tasks to be solved by the air assault groupings and detachments will in many regards be determined by their combat possibilities, which in turn will depend on the quantity and quality of armaments and the organizational structure. According to our experience, the most efficient structure is the air assault brigade in the front and the air assault battalion in the army corps.

The air assault brigade is capable of capturing three to four objects within an area of 200 to 300 square kilometers, or of defending an area 10–15 km wide and deep, and can resist an attack by up to two mechanized enemy infantry brigades. In many cases, the brigade can conduct raids to a depth of up to 80 to 100 kilometers.

The air-strike battalion is capable of capturing and defending one to two objects within an area of 10 to 15 square kilometers. And with the support of the attacking troops it is capable of fighting superior enemy forces for some hours.

As calculations have demonstrated, it takes 240 to 260 helicopters, among them up to 60 Mi-26s, to land an air assault brigade. For an air assault battalion it takes 50 to 60 helicopters, among them 15 to 20 Mi-26s.

"…"

The necessity of having specialized troop detachments and groupings as part of our unified forces is dictated by the existence of major naval operation zones at the

-549-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.