A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 122: Soviet Explanation of the
Warsaw Pact's New Military Doctrine at the Chiefs of
Staff Meeting in Moscow, May 18–25, 1987
These two statements by Soviet marshals Sergei Sokolov and Sergei Akhromeev were intended to explain to their Warsaw Pact military colleagues the important impending shift in strategy by Gorbachev from offense to defense. The meetings they are address- ing preceded by a few days the full PCC session at the end of May 1987, at which the new concept was adopted (see Document No. 123). While the two officers are con- strained to follow the orders of their civilian leadership, Sokolov in particular betrays the military's reluctance to accept unilateral reductions in armaments or give up the capability to "definitively crush" the enemy.On May 18, 1987, the Minister of Defense of the USSR, Comrade Marshal of the USSR "Vasilii" Sokolov, invited the chiefs of staff of the Warsaw Treaty member-states to a presentation of the draft "Military Doctrine of the member-states of the Warsaw Treaty" that is due to be considered by the Political Consultative Committee."…"Even if every country has its own military doctrine, it is important at the present time to draw up a military doctrine for the Warsaw Treaty.It is especially important to decide on the doctrine's political content, which will be binding for all member-states.For 20 years, NATO has declared its own military doctrine to be a defensive doctrine and accused the Warsaw Treaty of having an aggressive military doctrine.Although the Warsaw Treaty member-states have repeatedly stated their position on military issues, the military doctrine of the Warsaw Treaty has never been presented to the world community.However, it is important to explain to the whole world:
our relation to war and to the fight for peace, as well as
our view of the likely nature of an aggressor and our planned counter-measures in case of an attack.

For this reason, it has been suggested that a unified military doctrine of the Warsaw Treaty be presented to the world community.

"…"

The military doctrine of the Warsaw Treaty States is decidedly defensive in nature.

We will never be the first to begin a war.

"…"

Our defense doctrine requires that the army command and troops concentrate more than ever on defensive operations in their education and training.

This is an extremely difficult task.

-559-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.