A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 123: Records of the Political Consultative
Committee Meeting in Berlin, May 27–29, 1987
This top-level PCC meeting took place shortly after the Soviet Union had adopted the American-proposed zero option on INF1(Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces), a step which proved embarrassing to the Reagan administration because U.S. officials never expected Moscow to agree to it. The substance of this meeting was to approve a military doctrine that could supplement the Soviets' new peace campaign and make it more credible. The several speeches and stenographic record of the sessions excerpted below reflect a variety of viewpoints, including Gorbachev's, Kulikov's, the East Germans', and Romanians'. Of particular interest are Gorbachev's opening comments at the May 29 session in which he describes, with acute embarassment, the unauthorized landing in Moscow of a private plane by West German pilot Matthias Rust.a) Letter by Heinz Kessler to Erich Honecker, May 27, 1987"…"As I already informed you the group of military experts of the PCC has continued its editorial work on the draft document on "the military doctrine of the member-states of the Warsaw treaty."The editorial work continues to be complicated by the inflexible attitude of the Romanian representatives.The representatives of the Socialist Republic of Romania insist on their positions as already communicated:
that there is no common military doctrine of the member-states of the Warsaw Treaty but only doctrines of the individual countries and they have
they repeatedly persisted in not using the phrase "allied countries."

By repeating the same statements several times they try to diminish the politicomilitary and military value of the document on military doctrine.

The Romanian representatives furthermore asked to add that "the existence of military blocs is a constant threat to the peace and security of mankind," which basically denies the peace-serving function and defensive character of the Warsaw Treaty and puts it on the same level with the NATO Pact.

During consultations of expert groups they have stated that everything that could "frighten" other countries and people has to be avoided.

They have also upheld their objections to the changes suggested by the GDR and added their own counterproposal with the following wording:

1 President Reagan's proposal, announced on November 18, 1981, to forego the deployment of U.S. intermediate-range missiles in Europe in exchange for the dismantling of the Soviet INF missiles already deployed there.

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