A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 126: Proposal to Establish a
Warsaw Pact Information and Propaganda Department,
March 11, 1988
Reflecting growing Soviet awareness of the need to enhance the Warsaw Pact's image, as well as both to propagate its goals and policies abroad, and justify them to its mem- bers Army Gen. Anatolii Gribkov informs East German Chief of Staff Gen. Fritz Streletz about a proposal to establish an information department for the Pact. (NATO had always had one.)An Information and Propaganda Department, as the information and propaganda organ of the supreme commander of the Unified Forces of the Warsaw Treaty member-states should be established in order to promote understanding abroad of the military policy, life and activities of the armed forces of the Warsaw Treaty member-states, to neutralize anti-socialist and anti-Soviet attitudes, to eliminate "enemy images" of the USSR and the other socialist countries as well as their armed forces, and to exchange the fraternal armies' experiences on the promotion of foreign policy and counter-propaganda.The Information and Propaganda Department may be assigned the following tasks:
exert influence on members from the armed forces of the U.S. and other NATO countries by explaining the peace-loving domestic and foreign policy of the communist and workers parties, resolutions of the Political Consultative Committee, the defense-oriented military doctrine of the Warsaw Treaty member-states, and by unmasking the aggressive nature of imperialism and reactionary forces;
study and analyze the ideological, political and military situation in the U.S. and other NATO states, as well as the political and moral condition of members of their armed forces; prepare theses and arguments for informational and propagandistic work as well as for counter-propaganda; synchronize the efforts by the fraternal armies with regard to these questions;
organize a mutual exchange of information about the living conditions and activities of the national armies in the Warsaw Treaty with the intention of fortifying their brotherhood-in-arms, unity, and internationalist education of army members;
organize information exchange among the fraternal armies on questions of conducting propaganda in foreign countries via military channels; analyze the

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A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
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