A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 134: Summary of Gorbachev's
Speech at the Committee of Ministers of Defense
Meeting in Moscow, July 7, 1988

Gorbachev's previously unpublished speeches at Warsaw Pact meetings, such as this one before a gathering of defense ministers, offer an enlightening glimpse of the behind- the-scenes context in which events during this period were taking place, and provide new evidence on Soviet leadership thinking. In this address, Gorbachev outlines his vision of a Warsaw Pact with significant differences from what the organization was before. One of the key new features he foresees is that each member-state will be "inde- pendently active." In effect, he is allowing other members to follow their own policies. But, contrary to the belief held by many in the West in later years that he was actively encouraging reform, he was not. As this speech and other documents demonstrate, he was largely indifferent about it. His main interest was to disengage the Soviet Union from excessively burdensome obligations in Eastern Europe.

Cde. Gorbachev "…" emphasized that the work of the committee testifies to the increased activity of the Warsaw Treaty. After the Committee of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs, the Committee of the Ministers of Defense is now also proving how the alliance has entered a stage of quite some dynamics. This is good, and it is all right that the alliance has agreed to become more active in all directions. This has proved successful since it guarantees the best option for our decision-making.

"…"

Each party is responsible for its own affairs and fulfills its tasks on its own. There will be no toleration of attempts not to respect each other, or to interfere with the domestic matters of others.

We now have a new situation. During the last three years we faced many problems, which we can only solve by way of exchanging opinions.

Our parties inform each other about their most important projects. Altogether we can testify that a new level of cooperation has been reached.

"…"

I received documents from the United States proving that the United States is not afraid of weapons. They know that we can mutually destroy each other. However, they are afraid that the Soviet Union could achieve a new quality by means of a restructuring "perestroika" of society. Therefore they will do everything to continue the arms race.

In Toronto, Reagan and Kohl have expressed the opinion that the old means of fighting socialism will no longer be appropriate in the future. Cde. Kessler knows this very well since the GDR is following this development very closely.

Now they try to discredit us by discussing environmental problems. The adversary wants to divide our society in order to thwart perestroika.

-605-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.