A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 135: Speech by Gorbachev at the Political
Consultative Committee Meeting in Warsaw, July 15, 1988

Speaking to the PCC, Gorbachev by this time has begun to develop more fully some of his ideas about reducing world tensions, armament levels, and especially mutual hostility between the two major military groupings. His remarks represent something of a dress rehearsal, or perhaps an internal justification, for his famous speech at the United Nations on December 7.12Among the many interesting comments he makes are references to the growing power of the European Community, which he says the Soviet Union had made a mistake in underestimating, to the necessity of building bridges with the new American administration after the difficult Reagan years, and to the para- mount need to reduce not only nuclear but also conventional weapons—the only "usable" ones in a conflict.

"…"

"Recent developments" allow Socialism to be included more broadly and actively in the formulation of world politics, and to influence it more effectively and in a multi-faceted way, stimulating positive changes throughout the world.

Above all, the new face of Socialism now taking shape will undermine the traditional pretenses of the Western right-wing circles in exerting their dominating influence in the world, an influence which they have maintained with the help of an image of the enemy as a "Communist totalitarian monster." The conservative front that emerged in the West during the 1980s and was openly hostile toward Socialism, has begun to erode.

Being realists, we cannot wait—as if for manna from heaven—for new administrations to take over the helm in the West, with new partners and more democratic alternatives; but, in fact, we can facilitate the possibility that such alternatives will appear.

There is, for example, something of a paradox in the fact that, although several leading West European government figures maintain, shall we say, an even more reserved position in relation to the Socialist countries than does the United States, the business community of Western Europe, on the other hand, is beginning to come to us as if over the heads of the politicians.

"…"

A great deal will be determined by how and where the process of West European integration acquires its power. For the foreseeable future, it is apparently a steady and pivotal direction of development for this part of the continent.

"…"

We must openly admit that we were slow to determine the power and effectiveness of Western integration. We were lulled by the gentle sounds of "our" skeptical

12 For the text of the speech, see Vital Speeches of the Day 55, no. 9 (February 1, 1989).

-607-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.