A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 145: Letter from the Bulgarian CC
to the Romanian CC, June 21, 1989

In this letter to the Romanian Central Committee, the Bulgarian CC argues its case for a different approach to reforming the Warsaw Treaty (see Document Nos. 133 and 144). It particularly regards the Warsaw Pact as a "key factor for security and stabil- ity in Europe."

Dear Comrades,

The CC of the BCP has carefully examined your proposals of July 4, 1988, regarding the organization, improvement, and democratization of the Warsaw Treaty bodies and activities.

We share your opinion about the necessity of further improving the Warsaw Treaty's political and military cooperation mechanism, which at present is especially topical. At the PCC Warsaw meeting in July 1988, this question was put before our parties and states as a primary task.

We also believe that positive changes in international relations, arms reduction, confidence building, and European and world cooperation will create the necessary prerequisites for military–political groupings to simultaneously disband their military organizations. In the future, we will work toward achieving this aim. At the same time, realism requires admitting that conditions are not yet mature, as can be seen from the lack of any change in NATO's negative position in this respect.

In the present circumstances, the Warsaw Treaty provides a unique basis for cooperation among our socialist countries, an inseparable element and key factor for security and stability in Europe whose vitality and effectiveness have once again been confirmed with its renewal in 1985. Its unilateral demise would destroy this stability.

We have no doubt about the necessity of preserving the PCC as the main unit in the structure of political and military cooperation within the Warsaw Treaty. Removing it from this structure would lead to disorganization of the mechanisms of cooperation.

We share the opinion that it is necessary to direct the PCC's activity towards a broader discussion among our countries in the spheres of the construction of socialism and multilateral cooperation. We should exchange experiences in the socio-economic and ideological development of our people to foster the development of socialist democracy. This would fully conform to current trends in international relations, including the increasing role of non-military factors in international security. We do not see legal or organizational difficulties in integrating these issues into the PCC's normal activities in accordance with our mutually expressed desire.

Dissolving the PCC would be contrary to our views regarding the most effective way toward the simultaneous disbanding of the military–political alliances in Europe

-642-

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