A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 149: Memorandum of Conversation between
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Aboimov and the Romanian
Ambassador to the USSR, December 21, 1989

The violence that led to Nicolae Ceaușescu's overthrow in Romania was sparked ini- tially by a protest on December 16 in the Transylvanian city of Timișoara after gov- ernment officials tried to deport a local priest. That protest grew exponentially despite, and indeed in the wake of, bloody reprisals by the Securitate secret police. Ceaușescu's own reactions grew increasingly extreme as his security forces proved unable to stop the unrest from spreading to the capital. Typically, when Soviet bloc leaders faced significant domestic opposition, for instance in 1953, 1956, 1968 and 1980–81, they pro- fessed to see the causes in imaginary foreign conspiracies from the West. But here Ceaușescu actually blames Moscow and its allies for allegedly provoking the "events" in Timișoara. From the memorandum, excerpted here, as well as from other sources,33 it seems clear Moscow had no connection with the turmoil in Romania, for which years of Ceaușescu's misrule was more than sufficient explanation.

"…"

I told the ambassador that during N. Ceaușescu's meeting with the Soviet chargé d'affaires in the SRR on December 20, "Ceaușescu" expressed surprise that Soviet representatives had issued declarations on the events in Timișoara. Besides, during the meeting "Ceaușescu" asserted that the Romanian side possessed information that the action in Timișoara had allegedly been prepared and organized with the consent of member-states of the Warsaw Treaty Organization. Moreover, the actions against Romania were allegedly plotted within the framework of the Warsaw Treaty Organization.

According to our information, officials in Bucharest in conversation with ambassadors from allied socialist states expressed an idea about some kind of interfering action in the internal affairs of the SRR that was allegedly under preparation in the Soviet Union.

I must declare on behalf of our side that such assertions can only puzzle us, that they have no foundation and do not correspond with reality.

"…"

"Source: Diplomaticheskii vestnik, no. 21/22, November 1994, pp. 74–79. Translated by Vladislav Zubok."

33 See Thomas Blanton, "When Did the Cold War End?," CWIHP Bulletin 10, (1998) pp. 184–191.

-665-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.