A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 153: Records of the Political Consultative
Committee Meeting in Moscow, June 7, 1990

The materials presented below record the last formal meeting of the PCC. That his- toric session produced a public declaration asserting that the ideological enemy image in both East and West has been overcome and conditions have been created for peace- ful cooperation. Internal discussions at the meeting, however, show that differences among the members remained over how the Pact could or should be reformed. Czecho- slovakia went the farthest in favoring elimination of its military structures and even- tually played an influential role in steering the group toward dissolving the alliance. But for the time being, the members were prepared to see the Pact continue to exist, at least for a transitional period.

a) East German report on the meeting

"…"

The conference took place under completely new conditions. For the first time legitimate representatives chosen thorough free and democratic elections in all member-states took part.

2. As a result of the far-reaching democratic changes in Eastern Europe, the meeting was faced with the complicated task of overcoming the Warsaw Pact's crisis of existence and legitimacy and achieving, through a fundamental reshaping of the character, function and the activities of the Warsaw Pact, conditions whereby it can contribute during the transition period to the building of a pan-European security system. The participating states agreed to begin this radical renewal immediately.

Opinions about the reorganization of the alliance, especially in the military area, were considerably divided.

The most extensive demands were raised by the ČSFR37 and Hungary. The ČSFR was particularly focused on dismantling the military structures (dissolution of the Unified Armed Forces, placing the armed forces under national command only, defense of national territory as the only alliance obligation, transformation of the Staff of the Unified Armed Forces into a Coordinating Group).

Hungary stressed that under the present conditions, the military organization of the Pact has lost its right to exist and is no longer important. Based on the Hungarian view, it could possibly be liquidated by the end of 1991. "…"

With a view to protecting its security interests, Poland is currently not prepared to go along with such a far-reaching position. The USSR agreed with the need for balance and stability in reshaping the Warsaw Pact. Bulgaria supported this position.

37 Czechoslovak Federal Republic.

-674-

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