A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 1955-1991

By Vojtech Mastny; Malcolm Byrne | Go to book overview

Document No. 155: Agreement on the Cessation of the
Military Provisions of the Warsaw Pact, February 25, 1991
This historic document provided for an end to the military provisions of the Warsaw Pact, a key step in the eventual dissolution of the alliance. It was prepared at a meet- ing of foreign ministers of the treaty's member-states. Unfortunately, this was also the meeting where members agreed to withhold all important Pact documents from third parties unless the signatories unanimously consented to their release. Not only did they neglect to formulate any declassification procedures, but they failed to anticipate the very disappearance of some of the signatory states themselves—the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia."…"1. As of 31 March 1991, the following documents will cease to be in force:
Protocol on the creation of a Unified Command for the Armed Forces of the member-states of the treaty of friendship, cooperation, and mutual assistance from 14 May 1955
Statute of the Committee of Ministers of Defense of the member-states of the Warsaw Pact in peace time from 17 March 1969
Statute of the Unified Armed Forces and Unified Command of the member-states of the Warsaw Treaty in peace time from 17 March 1969
Statute of the Military Council of the Unified Armed Forces of the member-states of the Warsaw Treaty in peace time from 17 March 1969
Statute of a common anti-aircraft defense system for the member-states of the Warsaw Treaty in peace time from 17 March 1969
Statute of the Unified Armed Forces of the member-states of the Warsaw Treaty and their leadership organs in war time from 18 March 1980

As well as all other documents adopted in connection with the above-mentioned acts, as implemented, altered, or amended.

In accordance with the foregoing, as of 31 March 1991 all military organs and structures created within the framework of the Warsaw Treaty—the Committee of Ministers of Defense, the Unified Command of the Unified Armed Forces, the Military Council of the UAF, the Staff and Committee on Technology of the UAF, the Military Scientific and Technical Council of the UAF, the Unified Air Defense System of the member-states of the Warsaw Treaty—are abolished. In addition, all military activity conducted within the framework of the Warsaw Treaty is terminated.

2. In accordance with point 1, as of 31 March 1991 the activity of military personnel of national armies in the administrative organs of the Unified Armed Forces and in the apparatus of the agencies of the supreme commander of the Unified Armed Forces in the national ministries of defense is terminated, as is the payment of financial dues to the Unified Command.

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