Writing after Sidney: The Literary Response to Sir Philip Sidney, 1586-1640

By Gavin Alexander | Go to book overview

Preface

I could hardly writ…ook like this and not be acutely conscious of the many debt…we to friends, family members, and colleagues, or mindful of how influential even the most casual conversations can turn out to be. Perhap…ouldn't have been drawn t…iterary family if my own family hadn't been so crowded with extraordinary people. For their love, support, and example…m deeply grateful. My research has taken me to the British Library in London, the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, and the Newberry Library in Chicago, an…m grateful to the staff of those libraries for their help. But the book has been principally researched and written within the intellectual community and the libraries of the University of Cambridge, an…w…reat debt to the many teachers, colleagues, friends, and librarians not named below. My first home in Cambridge was Caius College, and much of my early work was done in its marvellous Library…lace where I have had more than my share of serendipity. My longest-standing debt is to my brilliant teachers at Caius, John Casey, Jeremy Prynne (who also ran that Library), and especially Colin Burrow, who went on to b…ise supervisor of my doctoral work…aster's course ha…uge impact on the wa…ork and the kinds of question I ask. My teachers on the course—especially Marie Axton, Anne Barton, John Kerrigan, and Jeremy Maule—offere…ormidable challenge to my ways of thinking; they subsequently became colleagues, an…m deeply grateful for their example and support. The first phase of my research was completed a…esearch Fellow at Caius, an…emain profoundly indebted to the Master and Fellows of that College for all they have done for me…iatus coincided wit…usy few years establishing myself a…ecturer in the Faculty of English an…ellow at Christ's College…m grateful to the academic and administrative staff of both institutions for the support that enabled me to keep my eye on what still had to be done. And the AHRC made completing this book possible wit…esearch Leave award in 2003. The help of David Colclough, Katrin Ettenhuber, and Hester Lees-Jeffries has been vital. Other friends and colleagues who have shared work, ideas, or good advice, or offered much appreciated support and encouragement are Sylvia Adamson, Richard Axton, Kate Bennett, Joseph Black, Ian

-vii-

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Writing after Sidney: The Literary Response to Sir Philip Sidney, 1586-1640
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • Note on Spelling, References, and Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction xix
  • 1 - Dialogue and Incompletion 1
  • 2 - Elegies and Legacies 56
  • 3 - the Last Word 76
  • 4 - Families and Friends 128
  • 5 - Finding and Making 149
  • 6 - Lyric after Sidney 193
  • 7 - Life after Sidney 220
  • 8 - Versions of Arcadia 262
  • 9 - A Constant Art 283
  • Postscript 332
  • Bibliography 339
  • Index 363
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