Encyclopedia of Family Health - Vol. 15

By David B. Jacoby; Robert M. Youngson | Go to book overview

Sports injury

Questions and Answers

I wear dental braces. Can I use a
mouth protector to play football?

Anyone playing a sport that carries
a risk of injury should wear a
mouth protector. It will provide a
barrier between your braces and
your cheek or lips, limiting the risk
of soft tissue injuries. Your dentist
or orthodontist will help you select
the most suitable mouth protector.

I recently took up golf. Should I be
aware of any potential injuries?

Although sports such as football
produce far more injuries—and
more serious ones—than golf,
golfers can suffer serious injury
to the elbow, spine, knee, hip, or
wrist. Golfer’s elbow is among the
most common complaints, and
strengthening forearm muscles
can help avoid this. The American
Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons
suggests some simple exercises to
do, such as squeezing a tennis ball
for five minutes at a time, and wrist
curls and reverse wrist curls using a
lightweight dumbbell.

I play a lot of sports. My mother
read about a government study
that said playing sports in areas
with highly polluted air levels can
lead to asthma. Is this true?

Asthma is the most common
chronic disease of childhood, and it
has been increasing in children in
developed countries over the last
few decades. The National Institute
of Environmental Health Sciences
sponsored a study of 3,500 children
in California. The participants who
had no previous history of asthma
were exposed to different levels
and mixtures of air pollutants. The
results showed that 265 children
had been diagnosed with asthma
in the followup session, and those
who played three or more outdoor
sports in high-ozone areas were
more than three times more likely
to develop asthma compared with
children who did not play sports.

Millions of people engage in sports on a daily basis—in schools and colleges, for recreation, and in a professional capacity. While being fit is important, every year the U.S. medical services treat more than 10 million sports-related injuries—3.5 million of which are in children under 15.

In a society that places looks, physique, and health above everything else, sports stars like Michael Jordan, who earn millions of dollars, are seen as positive role models. Many people believe that sports keep young people off the streets and out of trouble, and teach them coordination, stamina, and how to work as part of a team. Some people claim that sports celebrities have a godlike status, and most fans want to imitate them in every way—from their perfect physiques and high earnings to their often very glamorous lifestyles. As a result, some critics claim, some sports participants push themselves or are pushed too far too fast, and may incur injury. In a best-case scenario, the injuries are minor; In the worst cases, however, injuries can result in serious medical problems.


Types of injury

Sports injuries fall into two basic categories: acute injuries and overuse or chronic injuries.

Acute injuries: These are caused by a sudden trauma—from a single blow, a twist, or a fall, for example. Acute injuries include contusions (bruises that may result in swelling or bleeding in muscles and other body tissues); abrasions or scrapes (see Abrasions and Cuts); lacerations (cuts usually deep enough to require stitches; see Lacerations; Sutures); sprains (partial or complete tears of a ligament); strains (partial or complete tears of a muscle or tendon), and fractures (cracks, breaks, or shattering of bone). Sprains and strains are the most common injuries (see Sprains).

Overuse or chronic injuries: These occur over time and are usually the result of repetitive action. They include stress fractures (small cracks in the bone’s surface often caused by overuse of the

The majority of rollerblading injuries are forearm or wrist fractures, which elbow pads and wrist guards can help to prevent. Helmets and knee pads also protect against injury.

-2050-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Family Health - Vol. 15
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Spastic Colon 2022
  • Specimens 2024
  • Speculum 2027
  • Speech 2028
  • Speech Therapy 2032
  • Sperm 2034
  • Sphygmomanometer 2036
  • Spina Bifida 2037
  • Spinal Cord 2040
  • Spleen 2044
  • Splinters 2047
  • Splints 2048
  • Sports Injury 2050
  • Sports Medicine 2052
  • Sprains 2056
  • Stammering and Stuttering 2058
  • Staphylococcus 2062
  • Starch 2063
  • Stem Cell 2065
  • Stenosis 2067
  • Sterilization 2068
  • Steroids 2072
  • Stethoscope 2074
  • Stiffness 2076
  • Stillbirth 2080
  • Stimultants 2083
  • Stitch 2086
  • Stomach 2088
  • Stomach Pump 2091
  • Strangulation 2094
  • Streptococcus 2097
  • Stress 2098
  • Stress Management 2103
  • Stretch Marks 2105
  • Sty 2112
  • Subconscious 2114
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome 2116
  • Suffocation 2118
  • Sugars 2120
  • Suicide 2122
  • Sunburn 2126
  • Sunstroke 2130
  • Suppositories 2132
  • Surgery 2134
  • Surrogacy 2141
  • Sutures 2144
  • Swellings 2145
  • Symptoms 2149
  • Syphilis 2153
  • Syringing 2156
  • Index 2158
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 2159

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.