Encyclopedia of Family Health - Vol. 15

By David B. Jacoby; Robert M. Youngson | Go to book overview

Strangulation

Questions and Answers

Can a hernia be strangulated?

Yes. It is a dangerous condition
and must be dealt with urgently.
What happens is that a loop of
intestine passes through a narrow
opening in the abdominal wall
and its blood supply is at risk.
Because veins are more easily
compressed than arteries, blood
can get into the loop but can’t
get out. Unless the loop is quickly
restored to its original position,
with its blood supply, tension will
increase until the arterial supply is
cut off. Soon after, the tissues of
the loop will die.

What happens if a strangulated
hernia becomes gangrenous?

When any part of the body is
deprived of blood, it soon dies
(becomes gangrenous). The only
possible treatment is to cut away
all of the dead gangrenous tissue
and join together the healthy cut
ends of the intestine.

My baby was born with a bowel
obstruction and had surgery. Why?

Doctors call this unusual condition
volvulus neonatorum. During fetal
development, part of the intestine
twists around itself because it is
not held together tightly enough,
causing an intestinal obstruction.
Immediate surgical correction is
needed to prevent the affected
portion of the intestine from
becoming gangrenous.

Can a baby be strangled by its
own umbilical cord during birth?

No. The cord may get twisted
around the baby’s neck, and this
can cause fetal distress and even
death. It is not strangulation that
is the problem, but cord
compression, which occurs when a
loop of the cord comes out before
the baby is born. Cord accidents
indicate urgent cesarean section.

Internal strangulation occurs when the constriction of a tubular structure of the body, such as the windpipe, intestine, or a blood vessel, prevents normal functioning and circulation. In some forms, it is potentially fatal.

The word “strangulation” conjures up an image of someone struggling desperately for breath while another person grips him or her tightly about the throat. There is, however, another meaning, since strangulation or compression of other parts of the body can also take place. Areas of the Intestine or sections of blood vessels in the limbs, for example, can be strangulated so that circulation is interrupted and function is impaired, and an inadequate amount of blood reaches the area (a condition called ischemia), possibly leading to death of the affected tissue (see Gangrene). The outcome is extremely serious, and urgent surgery must be performed.


Intestinal strangulation

Intestinal strangulation occurs when the blood flow to the Intestine is interrupted, leading to swelling (edema), discoloration (cyanosis), and gangrene. This condition is usually caused by a hernia (see Hernia); the telescoping of a short segment of bowel into itself (called intussusception); or a twisting of the intestine onto itself to cause an Intestinal obstruction (called volvulus). Intussusception occurs mainly in babies and small children, and is characterized by abdominal pain, vomiting, and bloody mucus in the stool. A barium enema (see Enema) can be used to confirm the diagnosis, and the obstruction is corrected surgically.

If a case of volvulus is left untreated, the section of obstructed intestine involved will die; peritonitis, which is inflammation of the peritoneum—the covering of the abdominal wall—will occur; the intestine will rupture; and the patient may die. Early signs of intestinal strangulation resemble those of intestinal obstruction: severe pain, vomiting of fecal matter, dehydration, failure of the contents of the Intestine to pass through the bowel, and abdominal distension. Peritonitis, shock, and the presence of a tender mass in the abdomen are also found with

External strangulation occurs when violent pressure is exerted on the neck’s carotid
artery, starving the brain of oxygen. Similarly, internal strangulations occur when the
body’s organs become deprived of blood, usually as a result of hernias
.

-2094-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Family Health - Vol. 15
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Spastic Colon 2022
  • Specimens 2024
  • Speculum 2027
  • Speech 2028
  • Speech Therapy 2032
  • Sperm 2034
  • Sphygmomanometer 2036
  • Spina Bifida 2037
  • Spinal Cord 2040
  • Spleen 2044
  • Splinters 2047
  • Splints 2048
  • Sports Injury 2050
  • Sports Medicine 2052
  • Sprains 2056
  • Stammering and Stuttering 2058
  • Staphylococcus 2062
  • Starch 2063
  • Stem Cell 2065
  • Stenosis 2067
  • Sterilization 2068
  • Steroids 2072
  • Stethoscope 2074
  • Stiffness 2076
  • Stillbirth 2080
  • Stimultants 2083
  • Stitch 2086
  • Stomach 2088
  • Stomach Pump 2091
  • Strangulation 2094
  • Streptococcus 2097
  • Stress 2098
  • Stress Management 2103
  • Stretch Marks 2105
  • Sty 2112
  • Subconscious 2114
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome 2116
  • Suffocation 2118
  • Sugars 2120
  • Suicide 2122
  • Sunburn 2126
  • Sunstroke 2130
  • Suppositories 2132
  • Surgery 2134
  • Surrogacy 2141
  • Sutures 2144
  • Swellings 2145
  • Symptoms 2149
  • Syphilis 2153
  • Syringing 2156
  • Index 2158
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 2159

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.