Encyclopedia of Family Health - Vol. 15

By David B. Jacoby; Robert M. Youngson | Go to book overview

Surgery

Questions and Answers

What is the average length of an
operation?

Operations can last from a few
minutes to many hours,
sometimes as many as 10 or 12
hours. On average, abdominal
surgery, such as a removal of the
gallbladder, can take between one
and three hours, depending on
how straightforward the
procedure is.

My father has to have surgery on
his bladder. His chest is bad so he
will have spinal anesthesia. Will
the surgery be painful?

No. Spinal anesthesia should take
away all painful sensation from
the lower half of the body, and
lasts for a few hours after surgery.
During surgery, even though he
will be awake he will be given a
tranquilizing injection.

How many years does it take to
become a fully qualified surgeon?

All surgeons have to go through a
basic training to become a doctor,
and this takes a minimum of four
years. They then spend a year as
an intern, after which they begin
specialist jobs while working for
their examinations for the
American Board of Surgery. This
usually takes a further four or five
years, after which the surgeon in
training carries on as a resident
for five to seven years.

Why do some patients have a
tube inserted in their nose after
they have undergone surgery?

A nasogastric tube is passed
through the nose into the
stomach to remove secretions
from the stomach before they
build up, and is commonly used
after surgery on the abdomen.
The tube is left in place for two or
three days until the intestines are
able to work normally again.

Surgical knowledge and techniques are continually advancing; keyhole surgery and endoscopy have resulted in faster recovery times and less invasive procedures; diagnostic imaging techniques help surgical accuracy.

Surgery has evolved greatly in the past 100 years or so with technological advances that are of benefit to both patient and surgeon.

Until about a century ago, surgery was performed with no anesthesia (see Anesthetics) and with little regard for the problems of infection. As a result, some patients died directly as a result of the surgery rather than of the condition for which they were being treated.

Four major advances have revolutionized surgical procedures: anesthesia, asepsis, microsurgery, and minimally Invasive (keyhole) surgery.

At a liospitcil in Chicago, a doctor drills into the head of a 21-year old patient who is
undergoing brain surgery
.

-2134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Family Health - Vol. 15
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Spastic Colon 2022
  • Specimens 2024
  • Speculum 2027
  • Speech 2028
  • Speech Therapy 2032
  • Sperm 2034
  • Sphygmomanometer 2036
  • Spina Bifida 2037
  • Spinal Cord 2040
  • Spleen 2044
  • Splinters 2047
  • Splints 2048
  • Sports Injury 2050
  • Sports Medicine 2052
  • Sprains 2056
  • Stammering and Stuttering 2058
  • Staphylococcus 2062
  • Starch 2063
  • Stem Cell 2065
  • Stenosis 2067
  • Sterilization 2068
  • Steroids 2072
  • Stethoscope 2074
  • Stiffness 2076
  • Stillbirth 2080
  • Stimultants 2083
  • Stitch 2086
  • Stomach 2088
  • Stomach Pump 2091
  • Strangulation 2094
  • Streptococcus 2097
  • Stress 2098
  • Stress Management 2103
  • Stretch Marks 2105
  • Sty 2112
  • Subconscious 2114
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome 2116
  • Suffocation 2118
  • Sugars 2120
  • Suicide 2122
  • Sunburn 2126
  • Sunstroke 2130
  • Suppositories 2132
  • Surgery 2134
  • Surrogacy 2141
  • Sutures 2144
  • Swellings 2145
  • Symptoms 2149
  • Syphilis 2153
  • Syringing 2156
  • Index 2158
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 2159

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.