Martin Luther: An Introduction to His Life and Work

By Bernhard Lohse; Robert C. Schultz | Go to book overview

5
ASPECTS AND PROBLEMS OF
LUTHER’S THEOLOGY

In this section, I shall not attempt to summarize the most important themes of Luther’s theology. Rather, I shall analyze a series of important points that illustrate special problems that we need to consider in our study of Luther’s theology. Some of these problems are not receiving adequate attention in current research. By focusing attention on these problems, I hope that this section will also contribute to the discussion of the most basic questions of contemporary Luther research.


5.1 THE METHODOLOGY OF DESCRIBING
LUTHER’S THEOLOGY

The question as to whether and how it is possible to describe Luther’s theology adequately has a number of differing but quite important dimensions.


5.1.1 Luther Made No Claim to Be an Innovative Theologian

First, we must ask ourselves whether Luther’s self-understanding of his role as a theologian permits us to undertake the task of describing Luther’s theology and whether such a description will serve any useful purpose. As already pointed out (see above, 3.43), Luther did not want people to call themselves Lutherans, because he did not want to be anyone’s master or teacher.

Luther thus never claimed to have done anything new in theology. He never even claimed to have created a new point of departure for systematic theology that was superior to his predecessors. In declining to make such a claim, Luther agreed with almost all the theologians of the early and metheval church as well as Eastern Orthodox theologians down to the present day. The attempt to find a unique approach to the central questions of faith or to the relationship between theology and philosophy is a typically modern undertaking. The first theologian consciously to claim such a new and better approach was Gotthold Ephraim Lessing. He asserted the superiority of his method in contrast to the method of

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Martin Luther: An Introduction to His Life and Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xv
  • 1 - Luther's World 1
  • 2 - Questions Related to Luther's Life 19
  • 3 - Luther's Role in The Complicated Controversies Of His Time 40
  • 4 - Luther's Writings 97
  • 5 - Aspects and Problems of Luther's Theology 139
  • 6 - The History of the Interpretamon of Luther 199
  • 7 - Editions, Scholarly Journals, Aids to the Study of Luther 238
  • Abbreviations 244
  • Notes 246
  • Select Bibliography of Works in English 271
  • Index of Names 276
  • Index of Subjects 279
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.