From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia, 1800-1880

By Joseph P. Reidy | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THE MANY YEARS this study has been in preparation have sweetened the joy of thanking those who offered assistance along the way. I owe the greatest thanks to my family. In dedicating the book to my parents, I offer back a small fraction of what they have given. I thank my daughters, Rachel and Megan, for their love and patience, and for keeping my feet on the ground while my head was in the clouds. I owe special gratitude to my wife and best friend, Patricia, for tolerating my preoccupation with this project and for not letting me forget that there are other things in life besides books.

Although somewhat easier to measure, my intellectual debts are no less difficult to repay. I owe most to Otto H. Olsen, who encouraged this project through the years and who unselfishly offered friendship along with sage advice. I am similarly grateful to Fred J. Carrier for introducing me to the joys and challenges of studying history and to Herbert Aptheker for first piquing my interest in slavery and emancipation. During my association with the Freedmen and Southern Society Project I had the incomparable good fortune of working with Ira Berlin, Leslie S. Rowland, Barbara J. Fields, Michael K. Honey, Steven Hahn, Thavolia Glymph, Steven F. Miller, Julie Saville, Wayne K. Durrill, Susan Bailey, Lorraine Lee, and Terrie Hruzd. Colleagues and students, especially at Howard University, also contributed innumerable insights for which I am grateful; of these, Adele Logan Alexander bears particular mention.

Special thanks go to those who commented upon various drafts of the manuscript; in addition to persons already mentioned, these include Stanley Engerman, Eric Foner, Eugene D. Genovese, Pierre Gravel, Carl P. Parrini, Lawrence N. Powell, and Alfred F. Young. Thomas Holt made particularly valuable suggestions during the late stages of revision. I benefited immensely from participating in two conferences at which I presented portions of this research: "Power and Authority in Southern History" at the University of California, Irvine, and "Cultivation and Culture" at the University of Maryland. Thanks to

-xiii-

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From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia, 1800-1880
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Maps xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The World of the Yeoman Settlers, 1800-1835 14
  • 2 - The World of the Planters, 1820s-1850s 31
  • 3 - The World of the Slaves, 1820s-1850s 58
  • 4 - Impending Crisis: The 1850s 82
  • 5 - The Civil War and the Demise of Slavery, 1861-1865 108
  • 6 - The Origins of Compensated Labor, 1865-1868 136
  • 7 - Creating a New Body Politic, 1865-1867 161
  • 8 - The Rise and Decline of Radical Republicanism, 1867-1872 186
  • 9 - Capitalist Transformation, 1872-1880 215
  • Conclusion - From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in Larger Perspective 242
  • Appendix 249
  • Notes 253
  • Bibliography 315
  • Index 347
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