PELICAN

Brown pelicans nest
in colonies in trees,
bushes or on the
ground. Tree nests are
made of reeds, grasses,
straw and sticks
.

THERE ARE SEVEN SPECIES of pelicans, all of which belong to the same genus. Two of these species occur in the New World and five in the Old World, distributed over the tropical and warm temperate parts of the globe. Both sexes are alike and all have massive bodies, supported on short legs with strong webbed feet. They have long necks, large heads and a thick, tough plumage. Pelicans are among the largest living birds. The largest of all pelican species is the silvery white Dalmatian pelican, Pelecanus crispus, which reaches 5¼-6 feet (1.6–1.8 m) in length, with a wingspan of 10¼-11½ feet (3.1– 3.5 m). It weighs 22–26½ pounds (10–12 kg). The most conspicuous feature is the enormous bill: the upper part is flattened, and the lower part carries a pouch, known as a guiar pouch, that can be distended considerably. The pouch of the brown pelican, P. occidentalis, can hold about 3 gallons (13.5 1) of water and is used as a dip net for catching fish rather than to store food.

Apart from the brown pelican, in the majority of pelican species the adult plumage is mainly white, tinged with pink in the breeding season in some species such as the pink-backed pelican, P. rufescens, of Africa. The primary feathers are black or dark. Some species have crests and in some there is yellow, orange or red on the bill, pouch and bare parts of the face.


Only one marine species

The brown pelican is the smallest member of the pelican family, with a wingspan of up to 9¼ feet (2.8 m) and weighing 4½-8¾ pounds (2–4 kg). It has a white head with a yellow tinge to it. In the breeding season the neck turns a rich brown with a white stripe running down each side. The wings and underparts are dark brown. The brown pelican is a seabird, but does not venture far from the shore. It is found along the southern Atlantic and Gulf coasts of North America through the Caribbean to the Guianas. Along the Pacific it ranges from central California to Chile, with one population on the Galapagos Islands. The brown pelican is the only truly marine pelican. The remaining pelican species are found on lakes, estuaries, river deltas and lagoons. The other New World species is the American white pelican, P. erythrorhynchos, which breeds on inland lakes from western Canada to southern Texas.

In the Old World there are pelicans in Africa, southern Asia, the Philippines and Australia, and in southeastern Europe there are isolated colonies of the Dalmatian pelican, which ranges eastward into Central Asia, visiting Egypt and northern India in winter. The breeding range of this species has contracted and today only about 100 pairs nest in Europe, with about 1,400 to 2,000 pairs in Turkey, Central Asia and Mongolia. It winters from the Balkans east through Iran and the Persian Gulf to Pakistan and India. Classed as vulnerable by the World Conservation Union (I.U.C.N.), the Dalmatian pelican has become extremely localized.

-1908-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Wildlife Encyclopedia - Vol. 14
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Paradoxical Frog 1876
  • Parakeet 1878
  • Paramecium 1881
  • Parrot 1883
  • Parrotbill 1886
  • Parrotfish 1888
  • Partridge 1891
  • Pastoral Ant 1894
  • Patas Monkey 1896
  • Peafowl 1898
  • Pearlfish 1901
  • Peccary 1903
  • Pedipalpi 1906
  • Pelican 1908
  • Penguins 1911
  • Peppered Moth 1915
  • Perch 1917
  • Pére David's Deer 1919
  • Peregrine Falcon 1921
  • Peripatus 1924
  • Periwinkle 1926
  • Phalanger 1929
  • Phalarope 1931
  • Pheasant 1934
  • Piculet 1937
  • Piddock 1939
  • Pig-Tailed Macaque 1941
  • Pika 1943
  • Pike 1945
  • Pilchard 1948
  • Pilot Fish 1950
  • Pilot Whale 1952
  • Pink-Footed Goose 1955
  • Pintail 1957
  • Pipefish 1960
  • Pipistrelle 1962
  • Pipit 1965
  • Piranha 1967
  • Pitta 1970
  • Pit Viper 1972
  • Plaice 1975
  • Plains-Wanderer 1978
  • Plankton 1980
  • Platy 1983
  • Platypus 1985
  • Plover 1988
  • Plume Moth 1991
  • Pochard 1993
  • Pocket Gopher 1996
  • Polar Bear 1998
  • Polecat 2001
  • Pollack 2004
  • Pompadour Fish 2006
  • Pond Skater 2008
  • Pond Snail 2010
  • Poorwill 2012
  • Index 2014
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 2016

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.