World and Its Peoples: Eastern and Southern Asia - Vol. 5

By Paul Bernabeo | Go to book overview

Geography and Climate

Myanmar (widely known as Burma) and Thailand form the northwestern part of Southeast Asia. The principal feature of their geography is the great span of latitude—28°16'—from the most northerly point of Myanmar to the far south of Thailand. The region stretches from north to south over a similar distance to that between Seattle, Washington, and Monterrey Mexico, and as a result, it contains a considerable variety in geography and climate.


IRRAWADDY RIVER

The principal navigable waterway of Myanmar, the Irrawaddy River flows entirely within that country. It runs 1,350 miles (2,170 km) from its source in the mountains in the north of Myanmar to its delta along the Bay of Bengal coast. Draining about one-third of the country, the Irrawaddy flows through the center of Myanmar. Except in its headwaters, where the current is too strong, the waterway is navigable for most of its course, and it is the main artery of transportation through Myanmar. Steamships can reach as far north as Myitkyina, about 160 miles (around 255 km) from the source, in the wet season and to Bhamo, some 150 miles (240 km) farther downstream, all year. Between Myitkyina and Bhamo, the width of the Irrawaddy varies considerably through the year.

Farther south, the Irrawaddy flows through gorges almost as far as Mandalay. In places, the gorges are narrow, flanked by steep cliffs. North of Mandalay, the waterway enters a region of broad plains in Myanmar's central dry region. After receiving the waters of the Chindwin River, the Irrawaddy meanders through a densely populated agricultural region. The waterway divides into many distributaries for the last 180 miles (290 km) of its course. The delta stretches between the Arakan Mountains in the west and the Pegu Mountains in the east and includes a number of large named rivers including the Yangon (or Rangoon) River, on which stands Yangon (Rangoon), Myanmar's former national capital.


GULF OF THAILAND

The Gulf of Thailand is a large inlet of the South China Sea that forms Thailand's east coast. The gulf is around 450 miles (725 km) long from north to south, over 300 miles (500 km) across from east to west, and covers an area of about 125,000 square miles (320,000 sq. km). The shallow Gulf of Thailand, which is nowhere more than 656 feet (200 m) deep, is an important fishing ground. The gulf did not exist as recently as 20,000 years ago but formed when sea levels rose alter the most recent ice age. Thailand's principal ports, including Bangkok and Si Racha, are along the gulf The waters of the Chao Phraya River (Thailand's principal waterway) How into the sheltered Bight of Bangkok, the northern part of the gulf, giving Bangkok access to the sea. Rock strata under the Gulf of Thailand contain oil and reserves of natural gas.


SALWEEN RIVER

With a course of around 1,500 miles (2,400 km), the Salween River is the longest waterway that flows through Myanmar. Whereas the shorter Irrawaddy River flows through the central, well-populated regions of the nation, the Salween flows through the eastern, more sparsely peopled regions and through difficult mountainous terrain for much of its course. Rising in Tibet and then flowing through China's Yunnan province, the Salween enters Myanmar in a mountainous region before cutting through the Shan Plateau. Unlike the broad Irrawaddy, the Salween is not navigable for much of its course due to rapids, but in the lower reaches near the sea, the waterway is used to float timber downstream to sawmills. For 100 miles (160 km) of its lower course, the Salween forms the border between Thailand and Myanmar. In its delta region around Moulmein, the Salween waters a fertile agricultural region.


HKAKABO RAZ1

On an outlying branch of the Himalayan range, Hkakabo Razi is 19,296 feet (5,88 1m) above sea level, making it the highest peak in Myanmar and the highest in the region. The summit lies close to the border with China but is within Myanmar. The mountain has acquired a certain distinction among mountaineers not only because it is the highest peak in mainland Southeast Asia but also because of its inaccessibility. Foreign mountaineers were banned from attempting the peak until 1993, and access to the mountain is still difficult. As a result, the peak was not climbed until 1996, when a Japanese and a Burmese mountaineer reached the summit, and the ascent of Hkakabo Razi remains an ambition for many climbers. Although the mountain is within a national park, the protected region is not yet open to the public.

-580-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
World and Its Peoples: Eastern and Southern Asia - Vol. 5
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Country Locator for Volume 5 Myanmar and Thailand i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Geography and Climate 580
  • The Land of Myanmar and Thailand 582
  • Geology of Myanmar and Thailand 590
  • Climate of Myanmar and Thailand 594
  • Flora and Fauna of Thailand and Myanmar 598
  • History and Movement of Peoples 602
  • Sukhothai and Ayutthaya 604
  • Later Burmese Kingdoms 608
  • British Intervention in Burma 610
  • Peoples of Myanmar and Thailand 612
  • Myanmar (Burma) 614
  • Government 618
  • Modern History 620
  • War and Independence 623
  • Independent Burma 626
  • Modern Myanmar 628
  • Cultural Expression 630
  • Art and Architecture 632
  • Music and Performing Arts 636
  • Festivals and Ceremonies 638
  • Food and Drink 640
  • Daily Life 642
  • Family and Society 644
  • Welfare 646
  • Yangon (Rangoon) 648
  • Naypyidaw 650
  • Mandalay 651
  • Moulmein 652
  • Pegu 653
  • Economy 654
  • Thailand 662
  • Government 666
  • Modern History 668
  • Siam in Transition 670
  • The Age of Reform 672
  • War and Military Rule 674
  • Modern Thailand 676
  • Cultural Expression 678
  • Art and Architecture 680
  • Decorative Arts 683
  • Music and Performing Arts 684
  • Festivals and Ceremonies 687
  • Food and Drink 688
  • Daily Life 690
  • Family and Society 693
  • Health, Welfare, and Housing 695
  • Education 697
  • Bangkok 698
  • Chiang Mai 703
  • Nakhon Ratchasima 704
  • Udon Thani 705
  • Economy 706
  • Further Research 716
  • Index 718
  • World and Its Peoples 722
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 722

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.