Scottish Independence and the Idea of Britain: From the Picts to Alexander III

By Dauvit Broun | Go to book overview

1

Introduction

Writing about Scottish Aspirations to Independence before the Age of
Robert Bruce and William Wallace

Hákon IV, king of Norway (1217–63), left nothing to chance in securing an orderly succession to the throne on his death. According to the saga of his life, the elderly king arranged for his son, Magnús, to be crowned on 14 September 1261, taking care that the ceremony was a replica of Hákon's own coronation and anointment in 1247 by the papal legate William of Sabina.1 But there was one person standing up in the choir of the church whose presence in Norway at this time had not been planned. A Scottish knight (called ‘Missel’ in the saga), along with a ‘certain archdeacon’, had been sent by Alexander III as envoys to the king of Norway; their attempt in July to escape back to Scotland without Hákon's permission had been foiled, and Hákon had ordered them to be detained over the winter.2 From his vantage-point the Scottish knight was able to see Magnús's consecration at the altar, and was deeply moved. ‘He wondered greatly’, we are told, ‘because it was not the custom to crown kings in Scotland’; and, according to the fullest account of the saga, ‘he was so greatly pleased with the consecration that he wept’.3 The mention of the knight's tears is, of course, first and foremost testimony to the saga-teller's art. If it was part of the original Saga of Hákon Hákonarson it would have been a poignant touch that a Norwegian audience shortly after King Hákon's death might have particularly appreciated: Hákon had died in Kirkwall returning from an expedition to assert his sovereignty over the Hebrides against Alexander III's claims, so a vivid reminder that the king of Scots lacked the symbols of coronation and anointment which signified kingship in its fullest sense would not have gone unnoticed.4 The knight's emotional response to the ceremony would not, however, have been out of place. As someone close enough to Alexander III to be entrusted with royal business abroad, he must have known that hopes of gaining coronation and anointment from the pope for the king of Scots had been consistently frustrated by opposition from the king of England.5 As recently as May 1259 an embassy had been sent to Henry III without success to ask (among other things)

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Scottish Independence and the Idea of Britain: From the Picts to Alexander III
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.