Scottish Independence and the Idea of Britain: From the Picts to Alexander III

By Dauvit Broun | Go to book overview

10
Conclusion:
From British Identity to Scottish Nation

Susan Reynolds has discussed the convergence of kingdoms and peoples in the mental landscape of Europeans in the period 900–1300 with regard to law and custom, government and consent, and ideas of common descent and language.1 At the core of ideas of kingdoms and peoples in Britain and Ireland, however, was the incontestable fact that each was an island. It was this reality which shaped the way the highest secular authority relating to each people was defined, and which gave the very idea of being English, Irish and Welsh its enduring power over other identities. When, in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, it came to conjuring up visions of long successions of kings and accounts of their deeds stretching back into the primordial past, it was natural that these should be conceived in terms of kingships of Britain or Ireland, even though each narrative was written specifically with the English, Irish or Welsh in mind. Once these histories took root in the historical consciousness — made easier by their telling in the vernacular — they became a key part of the infrastructure of English, Irish and Welsh identity for centuries to come, and helped to sustain the intimate bond between people and island, even though, in the case of Britain, two peoples claimed it as their own. It was inevitable, moreover, that the English, as the dominant force, would find it especially difficult, not to say impossible, to make a clear distinction between their country, England, and the island, Britain.


FROM PICTISH IDENTITY TO SCOTTISH NATION

How did the Scots fit into this pattern? There is no suggestion that they made a claim to Britain as their own in the same way as did the English or Welsh. Nonetheless, the underlying significance of Britain is forever enshrined in the Gaelic name for their country, Alba, originally denoting the island. This, it is suggested, can best be explained ultimately as the Pictish name for themselves. The implication is that the Picts (like the

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Scottish Independence and the Idea of Britain: From the Picts to Alexander III
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.