The Point Is to Change It: Poetry and Criticism in the Continuing Present

By Jerome McGann | Go to book overview

11
IVANHOE
A Playful Portrait

DAWN INGMENS:It’s something we made for the professor who spends too much of his time thinking about thinking. We thought he should be doing something about it.

ANGEL: About what?

MARY MARGARET O’MALLEY: About thinking of course.

GIRL POET: What happened?

JENNIFER: Well, first we got him to understand The Alice Fallacy.

DAWN INGMENS:That was critical.

MARY MARGARET O’MALLEY: Thinking.

JENNIFER: It started with Geoffrey’s Gen-X questions about Keats, but we all got in on the act—Chris, Margaret, me. The games began soon enough.

DAWN INGMENS:And what’s he doing now? Lecturing again. Hopeless. You give him something to play with and he can’t help talking about it.

IVANHOE. Education in a New Key
by Jerome McGann, in collaboration with Johanna Drucker
and Bethany Nowviskie

IVANHOE (http://patacriticism.org / ivanhoe) is a re-
search and pedagogical project for humanities scholars
and students working in a digital age like our own, where
books are only one among many cultural sources and ob-
jects of critical reflection. It is designed within the frame-
work of the traditional goals of humanities education: to

-199-

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