Border Citizens: The Making of Indians, Mexicans, and Anglos in Arizona

By Eric V. Meeks | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Border Citizens: The Making of Indians, Mexicans, and Anglos in Arizona began as a dissertation at the University of Texas at Austin, where I had the pleasure of working with an extraordinary group of scholars. I wish to thank Neil Foley, my dissertation supervisor, for engaging me in hours of discussion as I developed my ideas, conducted research, and wrote and rewrote drafts of the manuscript. Special thanks also go to my dissertation committee, Gunther Peck, David Montejano, Pauline Turner Strong, and James Sibury, who helped me to grow as a historian and offered insightful critiques of seminar papers and dissertation chapters. I thank my fellow students at the University of Texas who took time to read and comment on many of the chapters—especially Sean Kelley, Marc McLeod, Matt Childs, Hal Langfur, Brian Larkin, and Leilah Danielson.

At Northern Arizona University I have continued to benefit greatly from the insights and support of colleagues and friends. Susan Deeds, in particular, took time out of an extremely busy schedule to read and comment on chapters and to write letters of support as I sought external funding to complete the manuscript. Many other members of the NAU faculty have also offered their support, and in the process have become enduring friends. I especially thank Sara Alemán, Sanjam Ahluwalia, Mike Amundson, Jeff Berglund, Monica Brown, Jennifer Denetdale, Sanjay Joshi, Cynthia and Peter Kosso, Scott Reese, Gioia Woods, and Miguel Vásquez. I also deeply appreciate the support of Aaron Cohen, Raquel Rotnes, and Jerry Thull, who have provided a much-needed refuge from academic life in Flagstaff.

I owe a special debt to those who shared with me their own experiences of living in Arizona's borderlands. Octaviana Trujillo taught me a great deal

-xi-

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Border Citizens: The Making of Indians, Mexicans, and Anglos in Arizona
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Desert Empire 15
  • Chapter 2 - From Noble Savage to Second-Class Citizen 44
  • Chapter 3 - Crossing Borders 71
  • Chapter 4 - Defining the White Citizen-Worker 98
  • Chapter 5 - The Indian New Deal and the Politics of the Tribe 127
  • Chapter 6 - Shadows in the Sun Belt 155
  • Chapter 7 - The Chicano Movement and Cultural Citizenship 180
  • Chapter 8 - Villages, Tribes, and Nations 211
  • Conclusion - Borders Old and New 241
  • Notes 249
  • Selected Bibliography 301
  • Index 313
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