The Baroque in English Neoclassical Literature

By J. Douglas Canfield | Go to book overview

List of Secondary Works Cited

Ahern, Susan K. “The Sense of Nonsense in Fielding’s Author’s Farce.” Theatre Survey 23 (1982): 45–54.

Allen, Don Cameron. Mysteriously Meant: The Rediscovery of Pagan Symbolism and Allegorical Interpretation in the Renaissance. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1970.

Armens, Sven M. John Gay, Social Critic. New York: King’s Crown Press, 1954.

Atkins, G. Douglas. “Pope and Deism: A New Analysis.” Huntington Library Quarterly 35 (1972): 257–78.

Audra, Emil. L’Influence française dans l’oeuvre de Pope. Paris: Champion, 1931.

Barbeau, Anne T. “The Wild and the Garden: A Double Focus on Reality in Pope’s An Essay on Man.” Tennessee Studies in Literature 22 (1977): 73–84.

Baroque Topographies: Literature/History/Philosophy. Ed. Timothy Hampton. Special issue of Yale French Studies 80 (1991).

Barroll, J. Leeds. “Gulliver and Struldbruggs.” PMLA 73 (1958): 43–50.

Bevis, Richard W. English Drama: Restoration and Eighteenth Century, 1660– 1789. London: Longman, 1988.

Brett, R. L. Reason and Imagination: A Study of Form and Meaning in Four Poems. New York: Oxford University Press, 1960.

Bronson, Bertrand H. “The Beggar’s Opera.” In Restoration Drama: Modern Essays in Criticism, ed. John Loftis. New York: Oxford University Press, First published in Studies in the Comic, ed. Bronson et al. University of California Publications in English, 8.2. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1941.

Calhoun, Douglas. “Swift’s ‘The Lady’s Dressing Room.”’ Discourse 13 (1970): 493–99.

Campbell, Jill. ‘“When Men Women Turn’: Gender Reversals in Fielding’s Plays.” In The New Eighteenth Century: Theory, Politics, English Literature, ed. Laura Brown and Felicity Nussbaum. New York: Methuen, 1987.

Canfield, J. Douglas. “The Authorship of Emilia: Richard Flecknoe’s Revision of Erminia.” Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660–1700 3 (1979): 3–7.

———. “The Classic Treatment of Don Juan in Tirso, Molière, and Mozart: What Cultural Work Does It Perform?” In Drama and Opera of the Enlightenment, ed. Luis Gámez. Special issue of Comparative Drama 31.1 (Spring 1997): 42–64.

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The Baroque in English Neoclassical Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Foreword 9
  • Acknowledgments 13
  • Introduction 15
  • List of Abbreviations 21
  • 1 - Milton: Mysteriously Meant 25
  • 2 - Cavendish and Philips: Metaphysically Meant 34
  • 3 - Waller and Etherege: Materially Meant 42
  • 4 - Dorset and Sedley: Mischievously Meant 50
  • 5 - Buckingham and Rochester: Reflexively Meant 63
  • 6 - Behn: Paradoxically Meant 77
  • 7 - Dryden: Cryptically Meant 91
  • 8 - Killigrew and Finch: Ventriloquently Meant 107
  • 9 - Rowe and Pope and Tonson/Gildon and Curll: Parasitically Meant 117
  • 10 - Pope: Metaphorically Meant 125
  • 11 - Pope: Mockingly Meant 143
  • 12 - Montagu: Surrogately Meant 154
  • 13 - Swift: Eccentrically Meant 164
  • 14 - Gay and Fielding: Absurdly Meant 174
  • Concluding Meditation 188
  • Appendix Poems Less Readily Available 193
  • Notes 217
  • List of Secondary Works Cited 235
  • Index 243
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