History Films, Women, and Freud's Uncanny

By Susan E. Linville | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Much of the research for this book was made possible by a Faculty Fellowship provided by the University of Colorado at Denver, and I want to thank the institution for its support. I also wish to thank the UCD English Department for providing course release time, and Brad Mudge, the department’s resourceful chair, for finding creative ways to promote faculty research and for offering sage advice on an early version of the book. Other members of the department were generous with their time and intelligence, as well, and they have my gratitude for their insights into everything from Beetle Bailey to Shakespeare. (I alone am responsible, however, for dubious uses I may have made of the bard.) In particular, Elihu Pearlman, Jake York, and Joanne Addison were generous with ideas related to my project, while Pompa Banerjee, Nancy Ciccone, and Gillian Silverman provided close scrutiny of the manuscript and astute feedback at various stages of its development. Among the present and former students who inspired me, Paola “Alex” Arvizu, Tony Garcia, Sheigla Hartman, Mila Labudovic, and Matt Wigdahl deserve special mention. My dear colleague and husband, Kent Casper, offered the most support of all, in every conceivable way, and our collaboration has been the most rewarding of my life.

Beyond UCD, I owe a considerable debt to Diane Waldman for her intellectual generosity and expert advice. My gratitude also goes to the University of Texas Press, and especially Jim Burr, for their continuing commitment to my work, and to the two anonymous readers for the press, whose input made an appreciable difference in the quality of the finished product. Additionally, I would like to thank Bill Johnston, a POW during World War II, whose memories of the Battle of the Bulge helped me understand the importance of A Midnight Clear.

Two chapters of this book appeared elsewhere in different form. An

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