History Films, Women, and Freud's Uncanny

By Susan E. Linville | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction

1. Carol Gilligan, “Teaching Shakespeare’s Sister: Notes from the Underground of Female Adolescence,” preface to Making Connections: The Relational Worlds of Adolescent Girls at Emma Willard School, ed. Carol Gilligan, Nona P. Lyons, and Trudy J. Hanmer (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Press, 1990), 7. Although Gilligans work is often misinterpreted and dismissed as passé, as Susan Bordo explains, its center is a still very relevant “critique of the sexual division of labor that assigns ‘female’ values to a separate domestic sphere while keeping the public, male space (and ‘masculinity’) a bastion of autonomous selves” (Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body [Berkeley, Calif.: Univ. of California Press, 1993], 48).

2. Robert A. Rosenstone, Visions of the Past: The Challenge of Film to Our Idea of History (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Press, 1995); Vivian Sobchack, ed., The Persistence of History: Cinema, Television, and the Modern Event (New York: Routledge, 1996); Robert Burgoyne, Film Nation: Hollywood Looks at U.S. History (Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota Press, 1997); Marcia Landy, ed., The Historical Film: History and Memory in Modern Media (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers Univ. Press, 2000). See also Susan Jeffords, The Remasculinization of America: Gender and the Vietnam War (Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana Univ. Press, 1989); and Lucy Fischer’s discussion of momism and World War II in Cinematernity: Film, Motherhood, Genre (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton Univ. Press, 1996), 92–110.

3. Fredric Jameson, “On Magic Realism in Film,” Critical Inquiry 12 (Winter 1986): 303.

4. To cite one example, like Caliban, nonwhite male characters in Western literature and film have often played background roles, and like Caliban, some have also been conceived and punished as the would-be rapists of white women.

5. As for Singin’ in the Rain, it is Lena’s displacement that makes the very history of Hollywood in that film possible. Steven Cohan’s analysis of Singin in the Rain identifies some of the terms of this dynamic (“Case Study: Interpreting Singin in the Rain,” in Reinventing Film Studies, ed. Christine Gledhill and Linda Williams [New York: Oxford Univ. Press/Arnold, 2000], 53–75).

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History Films, Women, and Freud's Uncanny
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 206

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.