Restoring the Balance: Women Physicians and the Profession of Medicine, 1850-1995

By Ellen S. More | Go to book overview

Conclusion: Reconciling
Equality and Difference

The reasons women in academic medicine are not succeeding the
same pace as men involve a complex combination of isolation, cul-
tural stereotypes, and sexism, and difficulties of combining family re-
sponsibilities with professional demands.

AAMC Project Committee on Increasing Women’s
Leadership in Academic Medicine, 1996

I am relieved if radier than sex bias, the reason more women are not
breaking through the glass ceiling of academic medicine is because
their children are hanging on the tails of their white coats. Most of us
are happy to have them there, and academic medicine offers a level of
professional fulfillment, financial stability, and geographic flexibility
that is well worth the juggle.

Christine Laine, M.D., Ph.D., Annals of Internal Medicine, 1998

SEVERAL YEARS before passage of the Family and Medical Leave Act in 1993, a colleague described to me a cartoon that had appeared in the Houston Post. It showed a barnyard filled with hens, chicks, and roosters. Amid all the bustle, encircled by admiring poultry, stood a hen skillfully juggling eggs. At the edge of the circle, one of the onlookers whispered, “I just love the way she juggles family and career.” Unquestionably, the greatest obstacle still facing women practitioners is the need to accommodate the demands of childbearing and child rearing. Women in medicine in America have accomplished a great deal in a relatively short time. Nevertheless, a century and a half has been barely enough time to overturn nearly a millennium of discouragement and negative expectations. Given women’s numerical standing in the profession until thirty years ago—given, in Rosabeth Moss Kanter’s terms, their skewed minority of less than 8 percent—women have been a

-248-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Restoring the Balance: Women Physicians and the Profession of Medicine, 1850-1995
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.