The Medieval Theater in Castile

By Charlotte Stern | Go to book overview

Part Two Other Sources
of tbc Medieval Chester

3 LATIN TREATISES,
ENCYCLOPEDIAS, GLOSSARIES,
TRANSLATIONS, AND SCHOLIA

Castile has many resources that supplement the handful of extant texts and turn a barren landscape into a rich, variegated world:

—Latin treatises, encyclopedias, glossaries, translations, and scholia capture medieval images of classical theatrum, scaena, orchestra, ludus, comoedia, tragoedia, etc. and offer a complex view of classical and medieval entertainment;

—papal decretals, synodal canons, penitentials, and civil laws separate acceptable performances from proscribed activities;

—chronicles and travelogues preserve eye-witness accounts of medieval performances;

—ecclesiastical and municipal minutes and ledgers itemize the expenditures incurred in mounting religious and secular plays, pageants, songs, and dances;

—the pictorial arts give permanence to what in the theater was ephemeral;

—medieval performance texts like Poema de Mío Cid, poems in the mester de clerecía, cantigas de escarnio, Libro de buen amor, Dança general de la muerte, fifteenth-century cancioneros, and Tragicomedia de Calisto y Melibea, among others, betray varying degrees of theatricality, while some even contain plays or allusions to plays embedded in them;

—sixteenth- and seventeenth-century plays, literary texts, church records, antitheatrical treatises invite us to reflect back on an earlier age; and

—modern survivals of ancient traditions, particularly folk ritual and games enable us to piece together Spain’s medieval theatrical heritage.

Unfortunately, in Castile many of these sources are incomplete. Even the extant documents still need to be culled, catalogued, and published, which could take several years. So in the meantime, we

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The Medieval Theater in Castile
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Medieval & Renaissan Texts & Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Part One Castile's Lost Heritage 1
  • Part Two Other Sources of Tbc Medieval Chester 53
  • Part Three Literature as Performance 145
  • Part Four Post-Medieval Evidence 201
  • Part Five Working Hypotheses for Future Research 243
  • References Cited Index 279
  • References Cited 281
  • Index 313
  • Mrts 324
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