Lionel Trilling and the Critics: Opposing Selves

By John Rodden | Go to book overview
Chronology
1905Lionel Mordecai Trilling (LT) is born to David Trilling, an immigrant tailor from Bialystok (Poland), and Fannie Cohen Trilling, a Russian/Polish immigrant from London, in New York City on 4 July.
1905–21LT grows up in the New York City suburb of Far Rockaway and on the Upper West Side.
1918LT receives his bar mitzvah at the Jewish Theological Seminary after training with Max Kadushin, author of The Rabbinical Mind and a former student of Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan.
1921LT graduates from DeWitt Clinton High School, New York City, and matriculates to Columbia College at the age of sixteen.
1924Along with friends Clifton Fadiman and Meyer Schapiro, LT takes John Erskine’s honors course in English at Columbia, later called the Colloquium on Important Books, LT publishes his first poem (“Old Legend; New Style,” a sonnet) and first essay (on Emily Bronte’s poetry) in Morningside, Columbia College’s literary magazine, in November.
1925LT publishes his first short story (“Impediments”), which is also his first contribution to Menorah Journal, a secular Jewish magazine edited by Elliot Cohen; LT earns a B.A. from Columbia College, Columbia University.
1925–31LT contributes stories and reviews to the Menorah Journal.
1926LT completes a Master’s thesis on Theodore Edward Hook, a minor Romantic poet, and is awarded an M.A. in English literature from Columbia University.
1926–27LT teaches as instructor in Alexander Meiklejohn’s experimental pedagogical program at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
1927LT meets Diana Rubin, his future wife.
1928LT teaches evening courses at Hunter College, New York City.
1929–30LT is hired as a part-time editorial assistant at Menorah Journal.

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