Lionel Trilling and the Critics: Opposing Selves

By John Rodden | Go to book overview

14
Review in The New Statesman and Nation
November 1943

Alan Pryce-Jones

Alan Pryce-Jones (1908—) was editor of the Times Literary Supplement in the 1940s and ’50s and book critic for The New York Herald Tribune during 1963–66. He is also the author of a volume of poems, an opera, and a musical; his books include The Spring Journey (1931), Private Opinion (1936), Prose Literature: 1945–50 (1951), and his autobiography, The Bonus of Laughter (1987), among other works.

While noting that Trilling fails to understand some nuances of the Cambridge scene, Pryce-Jones lauds E. M. Forster as a “concise critical handbook.”

E. M. Forster has talked—instinctively one avoids “written”—without affection of “the naked worm of time.” He has used another metaphor too. Any novelist, he suggests, ought to dislike the clock. One thing has to follow another; the life in time has to begin with bread and butter before saying yes to cake; the evocative scarlet bus has to go somewhere, has even at times, for the sake of the passengers, to stop; appointments are made and kept, cheques are signed and then cashed. And yet what, he murmurs, has this to do with the life by values? How can the double allegiance be kept? The worm of time is a tape-worm, arbitrary and interminable; the clock swings up the half-hours and down again with imbecile rectitude. How can the life by values match its uneven glow against the unfaltering sequences of day following day?

These are the anxieties of a novelist writing about the novel; and with what heightened sensibility when the novelist is Mr. Forster. For his working life, at least viewed from outside, has been an undecided conflict with the life in time. It is the obvious fact about him. Twenty-five years of preparation, six years of victory, thirty-three years of abstention—not total,

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lionel Trilling and the Critics: Opposing Selves
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 490

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.