Lionel Trilling and the Critics: Opposing Selves

By John Rodden | Go to book overview

15
“The Moral Critic,” Enquiry
April 1944

Irving Kristol

Irving Kristol (1920—) is the author of Two Cheers for Capitalism (1978), Reflections of a Neoconservative: Looking Back, Looking Ahead (1983), and Neoconservatism: Autobiography of an Idea (1995), among other books. Frequently regarded as the intellectual leader (or “godfather”) of the neoconservative movement that arose in the United States in the 1970s, Kristol was a Trotskyist during his college days and a member of the famous Alcove No. 1 (the cafeteria meeting place of his political student group) at City College of New York, from which he graduated in 1940. In 1943 Kristol became (under the name “William Ferry,” his Trotskyist party name) a contributing editor to Enquiry, a little magazine of the sect of Trotskyists headed by Max Schachtman, and he later became acting editor under his own name.

Kristol abandoned Trotskyism and dropped his commitment to socialism toward the close of his World War II service in the army. After the war, he began writing for little magazines and literary quarterlies, and he became well known in American and British intellectual circles as an essayist/polemicist, an editor, and a provocative thinker and merchant of ideas.

Kristol became acquainted with the Partisan Review circle of intellectuals during his tenure as managing editor of Commentary (1947–52). (Kristol’s 1980 essay, “The Adversary Culture of Intellectuals,” interprets Trilling’s concept from a neoconservative perspective.) Moving to London, Kristol founded and edited (with Stephen Spender) Encounter (1953–59),then returned to the United States and worked as editor at the liberal biweekly The Reporter (1959–60) and as executive vice president of Basic Books (1960— 69).

Perhaps the organ most associated with Kristol and the public policy orientation of neoconservatism is The Public Interest, which Kristol founded (with Nathan Glazer) in 1965 and still edits. In its pages, and in several

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lionel Trilling and the Critics: Opposing Selves
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 490

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.