Lionel Trilling and the Critics: Opposing Selves

By John Rodden | Go to book overview

26
“Reality in Life and Literature,” Saturday Review
of Literature
April 1930

Ben Ray Redman

Ben Ray Redman (1896–1961) was an editor, journalist, translator, corporate executive, and poet. He served as literary editor of The Spur (1922–29) and managing editor of Travel (1923); he also did editorial work at G. P. Putnam (1924–26) and wrote a column for The New York Herald Tribune in the 1920s and ’30s, during which time he also translated several French and Italian literary works into English and worked as a vice president in charge of production at Universal Pictures. Redman wrote The Modern English Novel (1925), Edward Arlington Robinson (1926), and The Oxford University Press, 1896–1946 (1946). He also edited volumes on Voltaire and Thomas Love Peacock.

As the regular book reviewer for The Saturday Review of Literature (1944– 55), Redman reviewed several works by the New York intellectuals (including The Partisan Reader [1946], which Trilling introduced, and the 1949 reissue of Matthew Arnold). A well-known cultural conservative during the early postwar era, Redman admired Trilling’s liberal anti-Communism, though he criticized what he considered to be Trilling’s misconception, attributable to the “parochialism” of his New York circle, that conservatism at mid-century did not represent a serious intellectual force in America.

Mr. Trilling’s attractive title serves as label for a collection of essays written during the past ten years that range from pure literary criticism to a consideration of the significance and shortcomings of the Kinsey Report. In the course of them he has many interesting and some debatable things to say about “reality” in life and literature; Sherwood Anderson’s arrested develop-

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lionel Trilling and the Critics: Opposing Selves
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 490

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.