Lionel Trilling and the Critics: Opposing Selves

By John Rodden | Go to book overview

55
“Sincerely, Lionel Trilling,” Encounter
September 1973

John Holloway

John Holloway (1920—), professor emeritus of English at Queen’s College, Cambridge University, has written more than a dozen volumes of poetry and is the author of The Victorian Sage (1953), among numerous other books.

Often called an “intellectual” poet for his subtle, traditional verse written in colloquial language and a meditative tone, Holloway exemplifies the Arnoldian sensibility that Trilling admired. Personally acquainted with Trilling, Holloway saw him occasionally during Trilling’s year at All Soul’s College, Oxford University in 1972–73.

In the review below, Holloway praises what other critics have perceived as the Arnoldian quality of Trilling’s keenly dialectical temperament, which Holloway calls his capacity to “enter into everything but never lose his balance one iota.”

Sincerity and Authenticity consists of the Charles Eliot Norton lectures Lionel Trilling gave at Harvard in 1970. At one point in these lectures, Trilling found himself linking the names of Robespierre and Jane Austen. He paused to say it must be the first time those two names had ever been linked like that. Maybe: and it indicates what at this stage I am going to call merely the flexibility of mind of the book, that they were. Thinking these lectures over, I found I wanted to link two names that also don’t often come together: Gerard Manley Hopkins, whom Trilling doesn’t mention, and the other, whom he says a good deal of, Hegel.

In the Phenomenology, Hegel has an opaque yet inexhaustibly illuminating section called “Spirit in Self-Estrangement—the Discipline of Culture.” It offers much in respect of Trilling’s position. Hegel seems to start with the conception of the individual self in a primitive, primal relation to the so-

-335-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lionel Trilling and the Critics: Opposing Selves
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 490

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.