Lionel Trilling and the Critics: Opposing Selves

By John Rodden | Go to book overview

70
“‘for That I Came’: Lionel Trilling and the Self Now,”
unpublished essay
October 1997

Tom Samet

Tom Samet (1948—) earned his Ph.D. in English and American Literature from Brown University, where for four years he served on the editorial staff of Novel: A Forum on Fiction. Samet began his teaching career at Rutgers University in 1977. In 1986 he accepted an administrative appointment with the University Scholars Program at Pennsylvania State University, returning to full-time teaching two years later as a charter member of the faculty of Louisiana Scholars’ College, the state’s designated honors program in the liberal arts, at Northwestern State University.

Samet has held fellowships from Brown University, the Rutgers University Research Council, and the American Council of Learned Societies. During 1989–90 he served as Fulbright Professor of American Literature at the University of Warsaw, in Poland. Samet’s interests have centered on modern literature and literary criticism. His essays on Trilling, Edmund Wilson, Virginia Woolf, Hemingway, literary theory, and other topics have appeared in Critical Inquiry, The New Republic, Criticism, The Centennial Review, Explorations, Novel, and Sewanee Review.

In 1995 Samet was named vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty of Hood College in Frederick, Maryland, where he holds the rank of professor of English.

Each mortal thing does one thing and the same:
Deals out that being indoors each one dwells;
Selves—goes itself; myself it speaks and spells,

-466-

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