Life and Correspondence of Theodore Parker: Minister of the Twenty-Eighth Congregational Society, Boston - Vol. 1

By John Weiss | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII.

Letters: Theological, Religious Scholarly--To Dr. Francis--To Robert White, upon Shakerism--To Rev. S. J. May, Rev. J. H. Allen, and others.


TO MISS HEALEY.

West Roxbury, November 29, 1842.

Press of business has delayed my writing before, my dear sister, in answer to your kind and most welcome note. I have been delivering "Six Plain Sermons for the Times" in the Marlborough Chapel, Boston, during the last successive Monday evenings; and as each sermon occupied nearly two hours in the delivery, and only a part was preached, you may suppose the preparation of the said sermons required time and labour. To speak in the style of the Old Testament, they have been a "work of sweat and watching."

Last night completed the course, so to-day I have bad little to do but hear a few scholars recite who come to me to be helped in their studies, and to read Mr. Brownson's review of my poor book, which I have not had leisure to study or look at till now. Now I have the evening to answer letters of long date, and yours, my good Caroline, is the first to be answered.

Don't think I shall ever be hurt by persecution or neglect. I think I can stand in a minority of one. if need is, and feel no danger, except from an access of pride. I have lived long enough to know that a serious man is not to look to men for his reward. He that sows to the flesh "shall of the flesh reap corruption."

However, I have had the sweetest sympathy expressed from some very true and noble hearts, as you know very well. I am sorry for your position in the midst of what you must needs despise, if you had not a Christian heart still. I think it will be advantageous to you. It will call you away from leaning on external things, and teach you to rely still more on yourself and the invisible supporter of man. Ten years hence, I doubt not, you will rejoice in a depth unfolded by these very circumstances, now so disagreeable. Still more, you will help even the bitter evils about you: a good word, I fancy, never falls idle to the ground. You or I may not live to see it bear fruit, but others

-351-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Life and Correspondence of Theodore Parker: Minister of the Twenty-Eighth Congregational Society, Boston - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents of Vol. I xi
  • Illustrations to Vol. I. xiii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 17
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 49
  • Chapter V 89
  • Chapter VI 130
  • Chapter VII 160
  • Chapter VIII 200
  • Chapter IX 221
  • Chapter X 248
  • Chapter XI 282
  • Chapter XII 314
  • Chapter XIII 351
  • Chapter XIV 407
  • Chapter XV 437
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 478

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.