The Life of Abraham Lincoln: From His Birth to His Inauguration as President

By Ward H. Lamon | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII.

LIKE most other public men in America, Mr. Lincoln made his bread by the practice of his profession, and the better part of his fame by the achievements of the politician. He was a lawyer of some note, and, compared with the crowds who annually take upon themselves the responsible office of advocate and attorney, he might very justly have been called a good one; for he regarded his office as a trust, and selected and tried his cases, not with a view to personal gain, but to the administration of justice between suitors. And here, midway in his political career, it is well enough to pause, and take a leisurely survey of him in his other character of country lawyer, from the time he entered the bar at Springfield until he was translated from it to the Presidential chair. It is unnecessary to remind the reader (for by this time it must be obvious enough) that the aim of the writer is merely to present facts and contemporaneous opinions, with as little comment as possible.

In the courts and at the bar-meetings immediately succeeding his death, his professional brethren poured out in volumes their testimony to his worth and abilities as a lawyer. But, in estimating the value of this testimony, It is fair to consider the state of the public mind at the time it was given, — the recent triumph of the Federal arms under his direction; the late overwhelming indorsement of his administration; the unparalleled devotion of the people to his person as exhibited at the polls; the fresh and bitter memories of the hideous tragedy that took him off; the furi-

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The Life of Abraham Lincoln: From His Birth to His Inauguration as President
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction to the Bison Books Edition v
  • Preface xvii
  • List of Illustrations xix
  • Table of Contents xxi
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 19
  • Chapter III 73
  • Chapter IV 85
  • Chapter V 98
  • Chapter VI 121
  • Chapter VII 135
  • Chapter VIII 159
  • Chapter IX 172
  • Chapter X 184
  • Chapter XI 223
  • Chapter XII 274
  • Chapter XIII 311
  • Chapter XIV 333
  • Chapter XV 366
  • Chapter XVI 389
  • Chapter XVII 421
  • Chapter XVIII 444
  • Chapter XIX 466
  • Chapter XX 505
  • Appendix 539
  • Index 541
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