From Greenhouse to Icehouse: The Marine Eocene-Oligocene Transition

By Donald R. Prothero; Linda C. Ivany et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 16
Late Eocene-Early Oligocene Benthic
Foraminifera in the Gulf Coastal Plain:
Regional vs. Global Influences

Richard H. Fluegeman


ABSTRACT

The turnover in benthic foraminiferal faunas through the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the Gulf Coastal Plain has been considered abrupt by many workers. Although distinct Jackson and Vicksburg faunas can be identified, the transition between the two is gradThis gradual transition makes recognition of important biohorizons in the benthic foraminiferal fauna possible. In the Gulf Coast section, numerous lowest and highest occurrence horizons have long been employed in subsurface correlation throughout the Gulf Coastal Plain. The appearances of distinct Vicksburg species such as Lenticulina vicksburgensis and Cibicidoides cookei are interpreted to occur at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary in the well-known sections of southwestern Alabama and eastern MississipResults from the Mossy Grove core in west-central Mississippi, however, show that the appearance of the Vicksburg fauna occurs sometime after the EoceneOligocene biostratigraphic boundary.

Eocene-Oligocene benthic foraminiferal faunas from the Caribbean islands have little in common with those of the Gulf Coastal Plain because Caribbean assemblages are typically deep-water fauTheir turnover pattern is similar to that found in deep-sea cores worldwide and is related to gradual global cooling through the Eocene.

Although faunal turnover patterns in neritic sections are generally influenced by regional processes such as sedimentation rates, local tectonics, and relative sea-level fluctuation, the Eocene-Oligocene benthic foraminiferal pattern in the Gulf Coastal Plain may be related to global phenomena. A similar turnover pattern in Eocene-Oligocene neritic benthic foraminiferal faunas occurs in southern Australia. This similarity may indicate that the gradual turnover of benthic foraminiferal faunas seen in the EoceneOligocene of the Gulf Coastal Plain is a response to global cooling of the late Eocene.


INTRODUCTION

The Gulf Coastal Plain of the United States has produced a wealth of data on upper Eocene and lower Oligocene benthic foraminifera over the years. The works of Cushman (1923, 1935), Howe and Wallace (1933), and Bandy (1949) are four of the most Cushman (1923) described foraminifera of the Oligocene Vicksburg Group from localities in western Alabama, eastern Mississippi, and northern Howe and Wallace (1933) described a foraminiferal fauna from the upper Eocene sediments exposed at Danville Landing, Louisiana. Cushman’s (1935) wide-ranging study described foraminifera of the Eocene Jackson Group throughout the Gulf and southern Atlantic Coastal Plains, including samples from North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas. These papers demonstrated distinct differences between the benthic foraminiferal faunas of the Jackson Group and the overlying Vicksburg Group. Bandy (1949) studied the distribution of Eocene and Oligocene foraminifera in a section along Little Stave Creek in Clarke County, Alabama. Although primarily taxonomic, Bandy’s work showed changes in benthic foraminiferal faunas from the middle Eocene through the lower Oligocene.

The above works made great strides toward characterizing the upper Eocene and lower Oligocene

-283-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Greenhouse to Icehouse: The Marine Eocene-Oligocene Transition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 541

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.