ANNEX 2: SUGGESTED TOPICS FOR THE HIGHER
EDUCATION LAW AND UNIVERSITY STATUTES

Higher Education Law
The Higher Education Law should be at a very high level, assuming that there are secondary levels of regulation at national level (via State Council, SEdC and other edicts) and university level (via the university's own statutes and regulations). The Law should thus focus on providing the framework for detailed monitoring and regulation at both levels. If it concentrates on general principles and guidelines, it will not need to be revised at intervals. Its clauses should include:
General Principles
A general statement of principles concerning the autonomy and rights of the universities.
The right of SEdC to increase, or amend, at any time by regulations the powers, rights and duties of universities.
A summary statement of universities' overall mandate, their duties as regards society and its purposes.
Universities to have nonprofit status and to be independent legal entities capable of entering into contracts. The Chair of the Supreme Board or the President should be the legal representative.
Statement of the general principle that ministries or provincial and local governments shall have macrocontrol over universities, but shall not intervene in their management.
The right of any locality or group of enterprises and individuals from China or overseas to open an institution of higher learning, subject to the approval of SEdC or provincial government.
Confirmation of the exemption of universities from all taxation, as long as the profits from any noneducational activity are dedicated to educational activities.

Controls and Powers
The right of SEdC to alter at any time by regulations the ways in which macrocontrol shall be exercised by itself, ministries, provinces or local governments.
The rights of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and any other body named by the State Council to set quality standards, undertake evaluations or tests, or otherwise review the educational performance of the university.
The powers and rights of provincial governments to control and monitor the quality of teaching and research in the university.

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China: Higher Education Reform
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 160

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.