Mind, Heart, and Soul in the Fight against Poverty

By Katherine Marshall; Lucy Keough | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
A DREAM? Sant’Egidio
Fighting HIV/AIDS in
Mozambique

Mozambique today faces both dreams and hopes for a great future, and some tragic ironies and enormous challenges. It exemplifies in many respects the notion that it lives in both the “best of times” and yet also the “worst of times.” Mozambique emerged from one of the world’s most devastating civil wars with its population scattered and numb from decades of bloody internecine strife, yet has succeeded in resettlement and reconciliation with a speed and harmony that have defied even optimistic pundits.’ Mozambique remains one of the very poorest countries in the world (ranked 170 in the 2003 Human Development Index),2 yet its economic growth performance puts it near the top of most lists of strongly performing developing countries. And Mozambique began to rebuild a nation after decades of physical war, only to find itself enmeshed in a different war—one that takes still more lives—against HIV/AIDS.

The emerging effort to provide treatment to people affected by HIV/AIDS, involving Mozambique’s government, the Community of Sant’Egidio (one of Mozambique’s principal partners in the earlier peace negotiations and the subsequent early start in nation-building), and the development community, including the World Bank, is an inspirational story of a complex and creative partnership that seeks to respond to the

This chapter, prepared by Katherine Marshall, draws on Community of Sant’-
Egidio presentations and publications and an early draft by Olivia Donnelly.

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