Evaluating Faculty Performance

By Carol L. Colbeck | Go to book overview

for many academics—the autonomy to pursue their own academic interests in their own way. In Chapter Six, Robert J. Marine describes a framework for evaluating Web-based faculty work. He argues for more attention to the ways Web-work changes processes of faculty work and its outcomes.

The final three chapters illustrate practical ways that individuals, institutions, and promotion and tenure committees are using evaluations of faculty performance for career development and for departmental and institutional enhancement. Mary Taylor Huber, one of the authors of Scholarship Assessed (Glassick, Huber, and Maeroff, 1997), explains in Chapter seven how national discussions about redefining scholarship are being translated into campus policies and dilemmas. Her analysis of specific faculty cases illustrates the tensions junior faculty must navigate between old and new definitions of faculty work roles as they prepare for promotion and tenure. In Chapter Eight, Michael J. Dooris provides specific examples of how institutional research faculty evaluation tools can inform decisions by central administrators and faculty senates. James S. Fairweather considers the role of faculty evaluation from the perspective of years of research about faculty work and from his own service as chair of a college reappointment, promotion, and tenure (RPT) committee. Although his primary focus is RPT, he appropriately argues that all considerations of faculty evaluation must include the growing number of non-tenure-track faculty.

Taken as a whole, the chapters in this volume contain all four elements of Boyer’s scholarly domains: discovery, integration, application, and teaching. They also consider the impact of technology and accountability pressures on faculty work and its evaluation. Academic administrators, institutional researchers, and promotion and tenure committee members will find practical advice and information about processes and tools for evaluating the work of individual faculty members as well as the work of all faculty in an academic unit or institution. Individual faculty will find the information useful for preparing documentation for promotion or salary reviews.

Carol L. Colbeck

Editor


References

Birnbaum, R. “The Life Cycle of Academic Management Fads.” Journal of Higher Education, 2000, 71(1), 1–16.

Boyer, E. Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate. Princeton, N.J.: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 1990.

Burke, J. C., and Serban, A. M. (eds.). Performance Funding for Higher Education: Fad or Trend? New Directions for Institutional Research, no. 97. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998.

Glassick, C. E., Huber, M. T., and Maeroff, G. I. Scholarship Assessed: Evaluation of the Professoriate. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997.

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